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Rooster with swollen wattles is doing better but needs dubbed

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by IndianaLeghorn, Jan 20, 2009.

  1. IndianaLeghorn

    IndianaLeghorn Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 20, 2009
    Hello all,
    I am a new member to BYC but have been using the forum for research since early last Spring. Unfortunately, the last few days I have had to research frostbite and dubbing. I have 2 white Leghorn Roosters and 18 hens, a few of which are showing signs of frostbite. 3 days ago I noticed one rooster's wattles extremely swollen. I started the flock on Teramycin immediately. I also started researching what to do about the swollen wattles. The one thing that kept popping up in the forums was dubbing. I was debating the process. The next night the rooster was having trouble breathing and his head was drooping as he roosted. He had fluid and foam coming from his beak because his head was so low as he roosted. I took him in the house and put him in a box in the warm basement. I immediately came back to this sight and found instructions on dubbing again. I found an article that stipulates draining the swollen wattles to allow dubbing. I did that with a sterilized razor blade. He didn't even flinch when I slit his wattles. Clear fluid and blood oozed for a few hours. He was not drinking or even moving on his own so I put Teramycin water in his mouth with a straw until I was sure he had enough liquids for a while. The next morning he was a little alert and his wattles looked almost normal. Later that day he was drinking and eating on his own. Today he is very alert and seems fine. I still have him in the basement and decided to dub his comb and wattles. I obtained a pair of surgical scissors and had a pair of kitchen shears as backup. I wrapped him up in a towel and held him with my legs. I tried the surgical scissors but they didn't work well and he DID NOT enjoy them. I switched to the kitchen shears to try to remove a single frostbitten tip from his comb. They worked but again, he DID NOT enjoy them. I removed another tip thinking that I was doing more good than harm but there was a LOT OF BLOOD. I decided to stop the whole process and see if anyone else has any other ideas.
     
  2. BJ

    BJ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 20, 2007
    If he was starting to look better, then let him continue to heal. Don't dub him!! Can you apply antibiotic and let him heal up from the dubbing? Did he stop bleeding?
     
  3. morelcabin

    morelcabin Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 8, 2007
    Ontario Canada
    Dubbing is not a good idea for your average everyday person to try:>) I personally wouldn't even attempt it...and I am pretty good with first aid. First of all it needs to be cauterized when you dub...which means that you have to heat up the cutting tool so that it burns the flesh to stop the bleeding. A roosters combs and wattles are its cooling system for the warmer months, the blood flowing through them is enormous.
    There are alot of 'city folk' on here who take some of the things the FARMERS are very familiar with and grew up doing, so KNOW how to do...and figure thay can do it themselves. Well you can't, a couple of chickens in your backyard doesn't give you the expertise to do what people who have grown up farming do as treatments.
    Yup everyone on here SAYS dub...from a suburban computer in a living room, but they have no idea what they are saying, they've never done it or anything close to it.... Don't listen to them.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2009
  4. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    and what was the fluid and foam from?
    infected sinuses?
    are you sure it was frostbite and not a respiratory illness?(swollen wattles can be a symptom of respiratory illness)
    is he wheezing?
    any mucus?

    did you check his crop?
    is he eating and drinking?
    describe his droppings..color and consistency.

    don't dub anymore..let him heal..give him some extra protein..
    such as cooked egg..maybe a little canned cat food..(beef)..
    give him some electrolytes for the trauma and stress.
    if you don't have any commercial mix electrolytes, you can use diluted Pediolyte.

    there is always a lot of blood whenever they have an injury to the comb.
    if he's still bleeding..you might have to get something to stop it..
    such as stiptic..or some other blood stop from the pharmacy..
    some people use a bit of flour..
    treat with betadine (diluted) then dab with flour.
    hope he's ok.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2009
  5. IndianaLeghorn

    IndianaLeghorn Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 20, 2009
    He bled a lot for a short time. It was enough to scare me. I had a stiptic pen upstairs in my shaving kit. By the time I ran upstairs for it and came back down the bleeding had pretty much stopped. In some of the dubbing posts it says to do it when it is cold out to help constrict the blood vessels. I wonder if the blood was because the rooster is in a warm place and because of that there is more blood going to his comb. I don't want to hurt him, but I don't want the frostbitten tissue to cause problems either.
     
  6. Poohbear

    Poohbear On a Time Out

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    Nov 12, 2008
    Texas
    morelcabin, you are SO FULL OF IT! Dubbing chickens does NOT require Cauterizing ! It's not a GUNSHOT WOUND, just a roosters comb.They stop bleeding after you release them and then they settle down. A little household flour on the cut if it helps your feelings then just put them down to be quiet. No antibiotic, no ANYTHING! I'm sure you are NOT an authority on dubbing from your silly responses but I am. This rooster will be fine in a day or so. Usually better to have someone hold them while they are being dubbed and especially if you are trying it the first time. Good GRIEF, would you get over it! Dubbing has been done for a CENTURY! Think about the fowls needs and comfort instead of your moral delimma. Dubbing is for the CHICKENS well being. Remember, it's a comb, NOT a radiator! By the way, I'm not a "City Folk". I'm a grouchy ol man that lives in the country and TALKS (mumbles) to chickens and dogs, DAGNABIT!
     
  7. IndianaLeghorn

    IndianaLeghorn Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 20, 2009
    Poohbear,
    Do you think the cold would affect the amount of blood? I can do it outside where it is MUCH colder. Also have you ever had to drain wattles before dubbing?
     
  8. Cuban Longtails

    Cuban Longtails Flock Mistress

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    Northeast Texas
    Quote:You are my hero! [​IMG]
     
  9. morelcabin

    morelcabin Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 8, 2007
    Ontario Canada
    Nothing to do with a moral delemna on this end...just think people should know what they're doing if they're going to cut up an animal, and it's not for food:>) I kill my birds when need be, and I eat them too...but I don't think I'd be doing anything that could cause more harm if I don't know what I'm doing other than from a book. Not an animal lover either as a matter of fact, so morals no...

    And Indianna I wasn't writing that as an insult to YOU...I wrote it in hopes that people who are encouraging others with no experience to this will stop...you were only doing what others were telling you.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2009
  10. Poohbear

    Poohbear On a Time Out

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    Nov 12, 2008
    Texas
    Cutting them outside in the cold will help. No mosquitos in the winter so cold is ideal for healing.Mostly in the dark so they don't get afraid. Better to let them do without water for a few hours before dubbing (this is called "drying" them). Also I check the moon phase to make sure it is a new moon and not a full moon. Some don't worry about the moon signs but I do. Less bleeding. If a bird is agitated, they bleed more. Quiet is the word. Quiet and quick. As you have found out, they will be a little harder to clip than it looks so just hold the wattle firmly (not pulling) and clip fast and hard. Dubbing is a good way to insure your fowl can tuck their head under the wing when roosting in the cold. Much better than freezing off. I usually put extra vitamins and electrolytes (powder form) in their water for a few days after dubbing. You can find it at co-op or feed stores. Its pretty cheap and good for the chickens. Might even mix a little Geritol (1/2 teaspoon) in their feed cup with a big spoon of canned Pedigree dog food (ground beef)for 4 days. Been using Geritol for years. It works. Sardines in soy oil every once in a while too. Blood builder and helps shine feathers. Some bleed a little some bleed more but if you clip the waddles properly, they will be fine and dandy. Just clip quick and quietly then place them on their roost away from other chickens for a day or two. I'm always open to e-mails folks.
     

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