Rooster

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by beerausch, Feb 1, 2017.

  1. beerausch

    beerausch Just Hatched

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    Dec 3, 2016
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    I have a huge Light Brama Rooster with a terrible attitude. Mostly it's with his breeding. We are way out of ratio and waiting on our new hens to arrive as of today. His problem though is with me. He is too young to have spurs but he bites me constantly. I want to stop this before his spurs come in. What is the best way to tame him down a bit? I'm an animal lover and will not be killing him. Thanks
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    The best thing you can do is block him from being forward and make him move away and respect you space. I use a fishing net, but plastic rakes or brooms can work too. Young roosters can be trouble but often grow out of some behaviors. If he's too rough with the hens you can separate him out for a while to give the hens a break. I have a pen in my shed for such a purpose.
     
  3. beerausch

    beerausch Just Hatched

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    I should explain that he is aggressive with me when I prevent him from breeding
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    My husband would probably try to bite you if you were preventing him from having sex[​IMG]

    If things are that bad, make a separate pen for him. That way he's not bothering the hens, and you're not trying to run interference with him. that sounds like a losing battle anyway......


    One thing I've noticed is folks who say they are animal lovers don't want to discipline an animal at all, or gain their respect. You'll need to do that, sooner is better. There are several threads here about doing that, most recent was titled something like Roosters and young children. I'm not going to re-type all that, you can search and read what's there. Lots of good advice. But in your case, I'd say just separate him until you have more hens, then try again.
     
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  5. beerausch

    beerausch Just Hatched

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    I don't have a problem with discipline. But besides kicking him away what do you personally do?
     
  6. microchick

    microchick Overrun With Chickens

    I've got a big Buff O rooster who is a doll. Literally. He talks to me constantly, lets me pet him but every now and again, he gets it in his little pea brain that he needs to bite me and show me who is boss. When he does that, I usually give him a hard flip on his beak or head with thumb and forefinger. If he does it again, the same. Third time he gets snatched off his roost, or caught and dangled by his ankles for a minute or so. Funny thing is once I dangle him, he starts talking to me like he's apologizing. I set him upright when he does that and test him to see if he is going to bite again. Usually that is enough to adjust his attitude for awhile, but every now and again I have to readjust his attitude. If he is being rough with a hen (he's barely a year old, matured late and a bit of a Klutz with the girls), I push him off of her and he will once again chatter at me as if asking me what I did that for. I usually tell him that I helped him out of his shell and I can just as easily help him into a soup pot if the need arises, but he knows he's pretty much safe with me.

    I agree about using a broom to keep him at a respectful distance if you feel threatened by him. They hate the broom. You do not have to hit them. All you have to do is make sweeping motions and they will be heading rapidly away from you. I'm very lucky right now. I have 13 very nice roosters. I'm trying to find homes for about half of them if not more. I don't know what spring will bring when their hormones really start to surge (about a month from now if not sooner) but at the moment, they are all respectful and gentle with both me and their hens.

    Roosters are going to be roosters though so expect the unexpected from them.
     
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  7. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    I booted a chicken once and broke it's leg. It wasn't a hard kick but I caught it just right. I learned my lesson that day.

    I use my fishing net to scoop them up if necessary and to block them. It has been a while since any rooster has shown me any aggression. I personally don't let mine mate right in front of me especially if the hen is screaming. So mine get a plastic coffee feed can tossed at them to startle them off. A dominant rooster never lets the submissive ones mate where he can stop him. I like to do as the top rooster will do.
     
  8. beerausch

    beerausch Just Hatched

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    Dear old hen likes dogs this is the kind of information I was looking for. The last thing I want is to hurt/ kill my rooster. I'm personally not afraid of him but I do want him to realize I am top rooster in the coop. I have tried carrying him with me, holding him upside down and running at him( looking crazy with my arms flapping. I want him to be aggressive with predators not people. Since we did end up with a surprise bonus rooster I am hoping that in 20 weeks when the new babies get added in some of the over mating will stop. [​IMG]. He is the larger roo with darker feathers. He is currently 6 months old. The aggressive bx only started a month ago.
     
  9. beerausch

    beerausch Just Hatched

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    Dec 3, 2016
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    Thank you so much for the helpful hints I greatly appreciate it!
     
  10. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    I find some roosters need management as they mature and others don't. If nothing else mine get penned up for a few days to months depending on their behavior, which has worked wonderfully on many as they are forced to interact with the hens through a fence and they learn how to talk to them instead of just strong arming them.

    I don't carry no one, except if I'm penning or moving them. Carrying a bird upside down isn't a good idea as they can choke and they sometimes can't breath well and the comb will turn purple. I grab their feet in one hand and my other hand is under their chests, otherwise I carry them like a football under my arm.

    Young roosters can be cocky, probably where the word came from. This time of year hormones are surging under increasing daylight and roosters are feeling frisky.

    Manage him correctly and he should turn into a good rooster. Some roosters try out an attack on their owners. You need to be confident and unafraid. Never give him your back, he should always give you his back or side and move away from you, never towards you.

    Control his movements and space to dominate. That's why a tool like a net or broom can give you power, and something like a plastic containers can be used to startle him from a distance.

    Dominance isn't about being the bigger rooster, it's about attitude and how you carry yourself. If you are afraid than they will sense that.
     
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