Roosters or Hens????

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by agrosner, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. agrosner

    agrosner New Egg

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    Jun 27, 2011
    Hi everyone! I have a few chickens that started to "crow" in the morning and are getting a little loud - as we were informed by one of our neighbors this weekend (yikes). I need to know if they are roosters or not (they have longer feathers going down thier necks and they like to stretch out their necks and flap their wings a lot). First picture will be of the three in question and then I have a picture of what the other two look like (much smaller and less agressive). I am not sure what breed they are either.

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    This is a picture of how the other girls look - their heads are not as filled out and not the same type of feathers up there either

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    This picture of my black hen (again, not sure the breed) shows the red on her head and under her "chin" which just gets me confused about the three in question.

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    Could I just have three hens that grew faster then the others or do I have 3 roosters. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!! [​IMG] Thanks!
     
  2. The Turken Lady

    The Turken Lady Chillin' With My Peeps

    It looks like you have three cockerels. They have long tail feathers coming in.
    As for the breed,they are Golden Laced Wyandottes.
     
  3. Rebel Rooster

    Rebel Rooster I Will Love! :)

    Jun 29, 2009
    Central SC
    My Coop
    I see at least 3 roos... [​IMG]
     
  4. akcountrygrrl

    akcountrygrrl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 3, 2010
    Nenana, AK
    Nope, sorry, those are three boys. The pointy hackle (neck) and saddle feathers (right in front of the tail) combined with the coloration (very intense red, not as much lacing as the pullet), large comb, and large wattles (things under their chins) all point to maturing cockerels. Hens of certain breeds will have large wattles and combs but don't usually fully develop them until they start laying.
     

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