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Roosters riding my hens hard and making their backs bald.

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by LoveMyBirds374, May 8, 2011.

  1. LoveMyBirds374

    LoveMyBirds374 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2011
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    I have several roosters and hens that are free range. My poor hens backs are getting bald and red. I feel so bad for them. Is penning up my roosters the only way to control this? I'm guessing so, but I had to ask. Thanks all!
     
  2. Rare Feathers Farm

    Rare Feathers Farm Overrun With Chickens

    How many hens do you have? How many roosters?

    You should have 1 rooster per 10-12 hens. If the ratio is higher than that--get rid of one of the roosters. The more competition one has, the more they will both try to "out-breed" each other and your hens will suffer.

    Also, besides thinning your roos out--trim their nails, the tip of their beak (just the pointy part) and invest in some saddles for your hens. This will help....
     
  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    It is recommended that there should be one rooster per ten hens. You can also purchase chicken saddles/aprons for your hens. If you have too many roos, consider penning them up, selling them, giving them away or freezer camp.
     
  4. LoveMyBirds374

    LoveMyBirds374 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2011
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    Okay, I definitely have toooooo many roosters. I probably have 4 or 5 roosters, and maybe 15 hens. Thanks for the advice!
     
  5. Eglyntine

    Eglyntine Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Reno/Sparks Area, NV
    I just had this exact problem. My poor hens. I had 13 roos to 37 hens and they were riding them bald. I ended up moving them to the menu for our Mother's Day BBQ Dinner. [​IMG] My girls are very happy now.
     
  6. BANTAMWYANDOTTE

    BANTAMWYANDOTTE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    JUST ADVICE TO ANYONE LISTENING?

    Are you aware that over-breeding (when two or more roosters breed the same hen daily) is very bad for your hens health? Over-Breeding can cause weight loss, dehydration, loose stools, soft egg shells, stopping of egg production or even death from infection? Are you aware the you are seriously endanger the lives of your chickens by allowing this? You need to take action soon if you have more than one rooster with 10 hens.

    Hens that are unhappy also quit laying, so there went breakfast!
     
  7. ParadiseFoundFarm

    ParadiseFoundFarm Goddess of Good Things

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    I don't have too many roosters as per the guidlines set here. What I do have an issue with, is the balding back-of-heads that results from a roo grabbing her and hanging on. All my girls have "coats" with wing protectors. Any comments?
     
  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:Try putting Vick's Vapor Rub on the back of your hens heads...It wont hurt neither, but will help deter.
     
  9. ParadiseFoundFarm

    ParadiseFoundFarm Goddess of Good Things

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    Quote:Try putting Vick's Vapor Rub on the back of your hens heads...It wont hurt neither, but will help deter.

    Won't it get in their eyes?
     
  10. BANTAMWYANDOTTE

    BANTAMWYANDOTTE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Try putting Vick's Vapor Rub on the back of your hens heads...It wont hurt neither, but will help deter.

    One possiblility is that your rooster could simply be too large to breed them daily. You can still produce fertile eggs with him but you may need to seperate him from them until they heal, in severe cases. I has to do this with my 13 lbs New Hampshire Rooster. After the hens heal I allow them to spend the day together free-ranging and then the nex day I leave him in the coop and free-rande the hens only. This works just fine. The problem is that they can't get away from him in a coop. Free-ranging the hens would allow him to breed but only enough to fertilize eggs. Over-breeding only happens to confined hens. This is my best advice, seperate the Rooster until the girls heal and allow him to spend every other day with them. If you really think that he may simply be too large you may want to consider a new rooster. (Younger Rooster's are more agressive when breeding than a rooster who is around three or more)

    VAPOR RUB IS A GOOD IDEA. IF YOU HAVE SCABBING USE PEROXIDE TO CLEAN THEM.
     

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