Roosters...to have vs not to have

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by brwneggs, Jul 3, 2010.

  1. brwneggs

    brwneggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I got a Isa brown Rooster that I just dont know about. I think I want to get rid of him. Excpet the Amish guy i got him from says "the hens will be happier with a rooster".
    Are the hens happier or is that a myth?
    I dont have to have one to lay eggs- he eats a lot!!
    I wrote in here just a few minutes agao, but if a hen is laying in a hole he peks at her, and makes her jump.
    Is it ok to get rid of the rooster? Will it make that big of a difference?
     
  2. Chicken Boo

    Chicken Boo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I do not think my girls are happier with the rooster. I added a bantam Japanese kabo in February when someone gave me the pick of her chickens that she was rehoming. I was hoping that he would be less of a problem since he was smaller than my standard sized girls. A few of them are bald behind the comb. The oldest ones have totally changed personality and are completely withdrawn and spend their time avoiding him.

    On the plus side, when they free range, he hunts for food and calls them over when he finds some. When the girls squabble, if it lasts more than a second he steps in and breaks it up. He announces when anyone comes into the yard. When any of the girls are slow going back into the run at the end of the day, he will go out and chase them home. He has been a totally deferential to humans and has not attacked nor gave any us any problems.

    He is beautiful and I enjoy having him around. He has been useful. But, as I said, I am not sure that the hens are happier with him around.
     
  3. brwneggs

    brwneggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Too bad we can not ask the hens. I just do not like him picking on the hens like that. It scares me.
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  4. Chicken Boo

    Chicken Boo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I will add that he came with a bantam hen mutt. She was picked on by all the other hens but he protected her. She sleeps under his wing at night.
     
  5. PhlyinPheBee

    PhlyinPheBee Poodles, Chicken, Goats--OH MY!!

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    I know that my hens were very different before I add a roo. They are not as friendly with me and they do run from him most of the time. So I think that for me my girls would be happier without one.
     
  6. cerridwenn

    cerridwenn Out Of The Brooder

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    you never *need* a rooster. i grew up with hundreds of chickens on an egg farm, and we never kept a rooster because my grandfather didn't want one attacking people who came to collect the eggs, or attacking the chickens, or if someone accidentally missed an egg and it should get partially developed and then that one got sold to someone who doesn't know anything about farming they would freak out... no, roosters were not welcome at our farm. we did have a peacock to protect the hens (and because he was so beautiful!) but i am a firm believer that unless you want fertilized eggs and unless you want your hens to hatch out a clutch, there is no reason to have a rooster at all.

    as for the hens being "happier", that is just old fashioned farm talk that equates to telling someone "don't you think it's about time you settled down and found a husband?" people who understand how babies are made and who think that it is the normal course that all animals should take in their lives just think it is necessary to have a male and female of everything for the world to be happy. especially if they are the sort who *do* want their hens to hatch out every so often to keep the flock going without buying new chicks, and assume that everyone else would want that too. there's nothing wrong with that, if that is what someone wants. but if all you want is eggs, you have a different goal in mind.
     
  7. henney penny

    henney penny Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have had roosters in the past and I would say that the hens are much happier without him jumping on them and tearing the feathers off there backs and heads.I do miss the crowing but thats all.
     
  8. brwneggs

    brwneggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would miss the crowing as well- and so would the rest of the neighborhood. Thay have grown to love Ferro.
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  9. 3goodeggs

    3goodeggs pays attention sporadically

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    I never wanted one. I saw no point to it. ever.
    We now have a gorgeous black australorp who has been the best thing . ever.
    The dominant hens were a nasty little click that had the girls plucked bald and cringing. my husband wanted one.
    he loves the crowing. i love the handsome guy.
    he is the last in the coop, he checks to make sure everyone is in before we lock them up.
    He offers food to the girls and will not eat himself until he sees they all have some. If some distracted girl is missing the treats, he'll go get her and cluck at her until she follows him back..

    If I were a hen, he'd take my breath away. [​IMG] dang! I should have named him Russel Crow! another missed opportunity for a running pun. nuts.

    ..And!!! the girls are growing their feathers back!
    He is a good rooster. We are lucky.
     
  10. PiedPiper

    PiedPiper Out Of The Brooder

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    I had my hens for almost a year before I rescued a Rhode Is. Red mix young roo. The girls took to him right away. The girls are all Barred Rocks. I have a very docile flock. I do have to say that the roo is extremely entertaining to have around and he does alert the girls to food and to danger. I also recently rescued a 2 month old Wyandotte roo to have as a second. Since my flock free ranges I decided having roos made good "bait" for predators since they seem to charge out in front whenever anything is amiss..
    As for the girls' happiness, I think they could go either way. They were happy before and are happy now. I don't think it matters one way or another regarding their contentment with life. Treats are what make happy hens, not roos [​IMG]
     

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