Roosters

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by kingsdaughter, Mar 8, 2007.

  1. kingsdaughter

    kingsdaughter Out Of The Brooder

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    OK Im almost ready to order now. I am planning on getting 25 pullets, several different kinds, and I dont know if I should order a rooster. I think I would like a sussex or partridge rock rooster, but I dont know if by chance some wil get thrown in.

    For those of you who ordered pullets, how many roosters do you think Ill end up with in an order of 25?
     
  2. allen wranch

    allen wranch Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    You don't need a rooster in order for the hens to lay eggs, but if you want chicks, that is another story...

    Most hatcheries guarantee 90-95% sexing accuracy, so if you order 25 pullets, that is 2-3 roosters. If you order less pullets, they will fill up the 25 chick box with "roosters for warmth".

    Some people like to have roosters around because of their beauty, some because they protect the flock by watching out for predators, keeping order among the hens, etc. Some even like to hear their morning crow.

    It is up to you (and any ordinances in your area) if you want a rooster. However, if you have small children, a rooster may consider them a threat and go after, and possibily harm them.

    I have eight mature roosters and their personalities are all different...
     
  3. pegbo

    pegbo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a speckled sussex Roo and he's is so good with the girls. I'd say he was gentle but he attacks everyone but me. He's my most gentlemanly Roo though and he even lets the girls eat first![​IMG]
     
  4. TheBrilliantHen

    TheBrilliantHen Out Of The Brooder

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    Some hatcheries guarantee a level of accuracy, like 90%, but even that allows for 2 to 3 in a batch of 25. I'd bet you could find a rescue rooster pretty easily if you end up with none, though.
     
  5. pegbo

    pegbo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm back! When I ordered from Mcmurray I ended up with seven Roos out of 26 chicks, much more then I was planning on. I still need to get rid of two!!!!
     
  6. kingsdaughter

    kingsdaughter Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 2, 2007
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    Wow seven! I sure hope that doesnt happen to me.

    I broke down and ordered one partridge rock rooster. I read they were calm and gentle. I sure hope so. I have seven children and four of the seven I would worry about if the rooster is agressive at all.

    During the first seven or eight weeks while they are still in the house, I wont have to worry about crowing, will I?
     
  7. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    I wouldn't worry about crowing that young, but there are always exception. I'd worry about the massive chick dust and odor first if they are inside for that whole 8 weeks.
     
  8. kingsdaughter

    kingsdaughter Out Of The Brooder

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    Really? Massive chick dust? Do I need to be rethinking my stratagy? Will they really smell? I was thinking maybe using a pooper scooper to scoop out the litter each day. Or is this unrealistic?

    How bad is this going to be? Im starting to get nervous.
     
  9. herman 48

    herman 48 Out Of The Brooder

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    I have had chickens only for a few months and I can't "read" their behavior yet. For instance, Elvis, my rooster, comes close to me every time I enter the chickens' enclosure and flaps his wings. He also does it when I call him by name. Is it a friendly gesture, or a sign of aggression?
     
  10. Beer can

    Beer can Overrun With Chickens

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    Any time I've ordered just pullets I got just pullets. Even when ordering 25. There is a chance they might throw in some 'packing peanuts' and they're usually roosters.
     

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