Rouen drake clinging to a hen?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by MintySeaSalt, May 25, 2017.

  1. MintySeaSalt

    MintySeaSalt Just Hatched

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    Oct 23, 2016
    IMG_3978.JPG IMG_3982.JPG So we got two duckings about a year ago to raise along side our chickens. When the duckings were still young one got carried away by a predator which left one lonely drake. Our big rooster seemed to look out for him and the hens soon allowed him to join their flock. As he got older he began to cling to one hen in particular, she is a 5 year old barred rock, the oldest of our birds and the head hen. Everywhere she went, he was not far behind.
    We though nothing of this odd pair for a while, however, a few days ago the hen got a rather large injury and had to go to the vet. While she was away the drake got very anxious and followed us around while looking for her. When she returned he became more attached then ever, yelling at anyone who gets close and chasing off other hens who are interested in her wound. Her medicine makes her drowzy, yet he will not leave her side.
    This behavior caused us to wonder if this particluar duck has chose a lifelong mate or has just made a huge bond with this hen. From what we've seen he has never mounted her or tried to breed, but he does nuzzle her face and follow her everywhere, and he seems very concerned about her current illness. If anyone has any sort of explanation of this behavior that would be much appriciated.
     
  2. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 25, 2015
    I have a hen who was raised with ducks so she felt chickens and ducks all as one,which also means she keeps a distinct pecking order between them.Most from lat batch raised with ducks interact very well together,sleeping with the flock out in yard etc.

    what you have is special,none of ducks and drakes are this close to my chickens. The reason he has grown so close to chickens is,he has no one else,so he imprints.He likely wont breed her,and ducks do not choose "Long Life" ,mates,bring another duck in (Female),and likely they will distant,that seems to be how ducks work.

    Lots of time you see house ducks and only one,is because they are more easily imprinted when lonely.
     
  3. MintySeaSalt

    MintySeaSalt Just Hatched

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    Oct 23, 2016
    We have got him two female ducks so he could have Some buddies of his kind, however, he seems to have no interest in them. He even chases them away from his hen when they get too close.
     
  4. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    In order to get him interested in the Female Ducks they need to be separated from the Chickens....
    The injury could of been caused from the Drake...Not a healthy relationship at all....Drakes have a penis and can kill a Chicken Hen by Breeding her....Roosters do not.....

    I would separate them till he snaps out of his interest in that Hen....:frow
     
  5. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 25, 2015
    How old are the 2 hens?

    Adding a pool and getting them all excited usually helps bring everyone together.
     
  6. MintySeaSalt

    MintySeaSalt Just Hatched

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    Oct 23, 2016
    The females are about 3 months old. We have a small pond for the ducks, but the drake doesn't like when the females use it. He chases them away and never shares, he won't even let anyone else drink from it but his hen and a rooster.
    The vet said that the injury was most likely caused by a cat. we've never seen the drake having any sort of agression whatsoever towards her, but I understand that things can go on when we're not around. I can post pictures of the wound in question but it is not a pretty sight.
     
  7. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thats pretty young,you wont notice any flirting until maybe 4 or 5 months,maybe later,it could take some serious time.Once they start mating it should pull them together.
     

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