rumpless gene ? (Tim this means you)

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by kinnip, Nov 21, 2008.

  1. kinnip

    kinnip Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2008
    Carrollton, GA
    Is this gene always dominant? Can rumplessness be polygenic. I'm still puzzling over my rumpless Marans.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    I want a rumpless Marans! [​IMG]
     
  3. kinnip

    kinnip Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2008
    Carrollton, GA
    If I can figure out how it happened, I'll look into making more.
     
  4. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    You can just sell me some eggs from that bird and I'll let you know if any hatch rumpless or make more rumpless when crossed with my Araucanas [​IMG] hehe...... seriously though... I'd LOVE some eggs!
     
  5. kinnip

    kinnip Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2008
    Carrollton, GA
    The Marans gang has just started laying and I don't have them in a separate run yet. By spring they'll all be settled into a private run and I'll be happy to start selling eggs. I only have 4 hens and the eggs I've eaten so far have been really nice. I bought them for eating eggs, but I've had so many people ask for hatching eggs I'd be a fool to keep eating them post-pullethood.
     
  6. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    Well, if you ever end up with some eggs that you know are from that rumpless one and want to sell them..... I'd be happy to buy them. [​IMG]
     
  7. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    This is the only info I have found so far

    Rp Rp, rp+ Dominant Rumpless, wild type Semi-Leth. Inc. Dom

    rp-2 Rp-2+, rp-2 Recessive Rumpless , wild type Rec



    I imagine yours is a case of the Recessive gene
     
  8. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    Here's some info also.....

    http://www.browneggblueegg.com/Article/Rumplessness.html

    Rumpless birds appeal to many people for lots of reasons. Some people like the rumpless look, the Araucana people think these birds better escape predators, and others believe rumpless birds do well in fights. If you have a rumpless bird and want to raise more, it is important to know which rumpless type you have.

    The simplest definition of a rumpless bird is a bird without a tailbone. Rumpless birds can have tail feathers but the standards of the American Poultry Association and the American Bantam Association do not allow tail feathers. There are many types of rumplessness in addition to the kind in these standards.

    Rumplessness is difficult to understand because many different genes interact to determine whether a bird is rumpless. In addition, there are at least three distinct types of rumpless chickens: dominant, recessive, and accidental, and the dominant type can be divided into two types: dominant complete and dominant incomplete. If you know which of these types is a particular bird, you can make good decisions on how to raise more.

    Unfortunately, you can't look at a living bird to learn its type of rumplessness; it is also very difficult to figure out the type of rumplessness when you dissect a dead bird. You can only disguish live accidental and genetic rumpless birds by breeding tests. However, rumpless birds from normal parents most likely are not genetic nor from a mutation.

    Test matings have shown there must be a considerable number of genes preventing the dominant rumpless gene from producing rumpless birds. There are two interpretations of this effect.

    1. Fischer suggested that whenever an undesirable dominant mutation occurs, individuals with genes that suppress the effects survive best. If a dominant mutation happens a lot, these modifying genes will accumulate and completely prevent the effects.

    2. There must be a lot of genes forcing normal tail vertebrae . Gradually these genes accumulate and suffice to inhibit the dominant rumpless gene.

    We have a rumpless Silkie from tailed parents; this might mean our rumpless Silkie's is the accidental type. However, the same parents produced three rumpless offspring in 2 years and no other parents produced any. This might mean our rumpless Silkie is (improbably) a mutation, is recessive rumpless, or that modifiers hid a parent's but not the offspring's rumplessness. Only test crosses will sort this out.

    You can find even more at the site​
     
  9. kinnip

    kinnip Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2008
    Carrollton, GA
    Cool, thanks. I'm not sure what her relationship is to the roo I have. Could be full or half brother, or not related at all. I just got 5 random chicks out of a big brooderful. It'll be interesting to see how the pairing works out. I wish I had a better picture of the roos parentage, but I guess that'll become more evident after a few hatches. I'm a nut about knowing whose eggs are whose. My BF is sure it's a sickness. Even with the eating eggs I collect, I must know who's it is. Then I watch them like a hawk to see what they're eating.
     
  10. flyingmonkeypoop

    flyingmonkeypoop Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 30, 2007
    Deer Park Washington
    I am going to say its a recessive rumpless bird. If you could mate it to a sibling it would be great. Another thing you can do is to mate it to a proper cock then mate one of the sons back to her.
     

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