Run near bird feeders. Disinfecting will make it ok?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by bluie, Aug 26, 2007.

  1. bluie

    bluie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hey everyone! I am pretty new to this forum, and haven't got chickens yet, but I am planning my coop and run for spring chicks. Here's my question. The best place to put my coop and run is near where we have been feeding the wild birds on the ground for 5 years. My plan is to A. disinfect the run in a manner described by Cory from Hawaii, then B. add fill and sand to raise the run so it will drain better. Its in kind of a low lying area. Will this two part plan be sufficient to keep my future chickens safe from disease? Our feral rooster that died of old age last year ate with the birds all the time and he was fine. Thanks a million!
     
  2. Yonaton

    Yonaton Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The wild birds that mainly live and stay in the area you're in (their indigenous habitat), aren't normally the carriers of diseases and pests. It's more common that birds that migrate in *huge* numbers that you need to worry about (starlings, cowbirds, grackles, etc).

    For years our birds have run loose (foraged) amongst all the indigenous birds in our area and we've never had any problems, one reason being I'd sit outside as often as I could and shoot all the cowbirds (blackbirds), grackles and starlings that landed anywhere within range of my .22 rifle. This was enough to keep the huge majority of the birds away from our flock.

    If you don't get too many of those species, you'll probably be okay, but it won't hurt to have a regimen of dusting at least once a month, and spreading Sevin dust and/or DE onto your sand in the run you're planning (I always mix 1/4 Sevin and 3/4 DE then spread it where/as I need it, keeping in mind I don't want it in too big an area(s) so it doesn't kill any (or many) of the beneficial insects or the bugs the birds like to eat, like grasshoppers and such).
     
  3. Zenbirder

    Zenbirder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yonaton, Please do not incourage anyone to shoot wild birds! It is a violation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. A misdeminor conviction can bring a $15,000 fine. All of the blackbirds, grackles and even starlings are on the list of protected birds. You can try to scare them away, but do not shoot or poison them.
     
  4. Yonaton

    Yonaton Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Those birds are disease carrying menaces, especially to farmers (corn fields are hit especially badly). There's no law against it in this state that I know of, and as far as I'm concerned, if the rest of the "International" community will keep those pestilence carrying things in *THEIR* country, good for them, but they shouldn't complain when their neighbors' land, flocks and fields get torn up by the things and their neighbors get rid of them...just like flock killing dogs, cats, coyotes, foxes, bobcats, etc, etc.

    As I said, my method has worked well for me, and I won't stop. It keeps my flock safe and clean, and since the "International" community won't pay me to use any other method, they can all go jump off a tall bridge.
     
  5. tiffanyh

    tiffanyh Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 8, 2007
    Connecticut
    Yes, there is a law about it in every state, it is a federal law that protects those birds. FYI.
     
  6. Yonaton

    Yonaton Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Correct, but if you will go and get one of the hunting season books from WalMart (or wherever), you'll see that in *this* state at least, those pests are allowed to be shot. They're under the heading of 'Varmints', or in other words, pests. The 'law' protecting those pests is against mass killings/poisonings/whatever, unfortunately.

    Like I said though, when the feds and the International community begin to pay me for the diseases and bugs my birds can get and all the food they eat that is for my flock(s) and send people to help clean up all the bird poop, they can all jump off a high bridge into a dried up riverbed for all I'm concerned.
     
  7. tiffanyh

    tiffanyh Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 8, 2007
    Connecticut
    wow.
     
  8. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Starlings are not federally protected, they are not a native species. The starlings in the US are supposedly all decendants of a flock released in Central Park, NY a hundred years ago.

    There is also a federal law that says you can kill blackbirds, magpies, grackles, etc. if they are causing damage. This may be further restricted by the states though...

    Here is what Texas has to say about it:

    Unprotected Birds:

    The only birds not protected by any state or federal law are European starlings, English sparrows, feral rock doves (common pigeon - Columba livia) and Eurasian collared-doves; these species may be killed at any time, their nests or eggs destroyed, and their feathers may be possessed.

    Yellow-headed, red-winged, rusty, or Brewer's blackbirds and all grackles, cowbirds (does not include cattle egret), crows, or magpies may be controlled without a federal or state depredation permit when found committing or about to commit depredations on ornamental or shade trees, agricultural crops, livestock, or wildlife, or when concentrated in numbers and in a manner that constitutes a health hazard or other nuisance.
     
  9. bluie

    bluie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 18, 2007
    Hey Yonatan! Thanks for replying to my posted question. Also I think its wonderful that there is so much stimulating discussion of various topics. However, could I please get more feedback about my question instead of the legality or morality of shooting birds? Respectfully to all, Bluie
     
  10. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Sorry Bluie. Yes, you can disinfect the area with a bleach solution or hydrated lime. Bleach is much safer to work with. I'm not sure of the need for it though. Most of us let our birds run the backyard or the farmyard, they are not quarantined or isolated from the wild birds or their droppings, but if it puts your mind at ease, go ahead and do it...

    How low is the area? Does it need to be built up a lot? If its just a few inches I'd till in a bunch of organic matter, like mulch, leaves, grass clippings and such. It will build the area slightly and increase the drainage. I'd only add sand if your soil is a heavy clay. If it's a lawn area that's only been mowed for a number of years it's most likely compacted and the surface just needs to be broken up to improve drainage.
     

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