Run roof design

smashleyrose

In the Brooder
Aug 17, 2016
17
0
12
Creswell, OR
So I'm in the design/building stage of my coop and run. Finishing the run first and then going to clean the stall out and put the coop together. (Wish we already had chickens to eat all the spiders in there...)

The run is 24' X 24' and is aprox 5ft tall and butts up against the barn, I already have the three sides covered with chicken wire, since we had that in the shed. I am throwing around some ideas for the roof. The barn is situated so it gets good afternoon shade.

a. 12' X 12' panels constructed out of 2X4's and supported by 4x4's and deck piers, covered in either chicken wire or 2X4" welded wire. So four panels will cover the entire run

b. The same as above, but one section will be corrugated metal roofing to provide an area for shade in the part of the run where the door is and to stay dry during the 9 months of Oregon rain.

I've never built a roof before and would like some input on the best method for constructing the metal part. It would be attached to the barn and then angled down from there. Thinking about adding a gutter at the bottom and funneling into a catchment, partly to prevent draining into the run.
 

Howard E

Crowing
5 Years
Feb 18, 2016
2,881
3,918
296
Missouri
Can you provide some type of photograph of the shed and run site? I'm having a hard time envisioning what you are describing.
 

smashleyrose

In the Brooder
Aug 17, 2016
17
0
12
Creswell, OR
Here is a long range pic of the barn and run, the three sides have wire on them and the blackberries are gone.



[/IMG]http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160817/9a0f15aa0512dfee19f807071587d00d.jpg



Closer look at the same angle. Wood pile will be moved to the wood she'd next week and I am considering putting a door next to the barn.


[/IMG]
334b431b2e344816c14aadfab23790a8.jpg


Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
 
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Dmontgomery

Songster
Apr 1, 2014
839
601
222
Longville, La
If you can see the roof from inside the stall, just follow that design out another 12'.
My suggestion would be to use 2x6's attached to the facia board then plywood sheathing over that. Screw the metal to the sheathing. Follow the slope of the existing roof if possible. If not, make sure the end is at least 12" lower than the existing roof for proper drainage. You will definitely need the gutter.
Hope that makes sense. This is just one possible way of doing it. Other contributors may have a better idea.
 

Intheswamp

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 25, 2009
2,373
112
256
South Alabama
Definitely install a gutter, if for no other reason than to divert all that roof run-off away from the coop/run.

Another option on extending the roof is to use pole construction... Bury your poles 2-3 feet deep, fasten girts to the poles, extend the new roof rafters from the building edge to overhang the girts a foot or so, fasten purlins (1x4's) down onto the joists, and finally screw your metal roofing down to the purlins.

In this image you can see the horizontal purlins and how the metal roofing lays across them to be screwed/nailed down...


If I was going to be buying a bunch of 2x4 welded wire I would be putting it around the perimeter fence rather than above the run...you will have animals approaching at ground level that can tear through chicken wire. Aerial predators such as hawks and owls can be stopped with chicken wire and usually bird netting, though raccoons can climb and easily get through both chicken wire and netting. Dogs will take little time tearing through chicken wire at ground level. Electric fencing ratchets up security a several notches if installed properly with a strong charger and a good aluminum wire.

ETA: What Dmontgomery said about following the existing roof design on out is definitely a good plan. Looking at it it looks like roll-roofing???? I'm not sure about making the transition from asphalt to metal...I'm thinking you will need to drop the metal, coop-cover roofing down a few inches below the existing roof edge and use flashing to help seal against rain.
Best wishes,
Ed
 
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NeChick16

In the Brooder
Jun 1, 2016
21
0
32
Central Nebraska
For the gutters I would go with a 6 inch, especially if you are going to slope it towards one end to a single catchment, that way you won't have any overflow issues into the run!
 

smashleyrose

In the Brooder
Aug 17, 2016
17
0
12
Creswell, OR
Definitely install a gutter, if for no other reason than to divert all that roof run-off away from the coop/run.

Another option on extending the roof is to use pole construction... Bury your poles 2-3 feet deep, fasten girts to the poles, extend the new roof rafters from the building edge to overhang the girts a foot or so, fasten purlins (1x4's) down onto the joists, and finally screw your metal roofing down to the purlins.

In this image you can see the horizontal purlins and how the metal roofing lays across them to be screwed/nailed down...


If I was going to be buying a bunch of 2x4 welded wire I would be putting it around the perimeter fence rather than above the run...you will have animals approaching at ground level that can tear through chicken wire. Aerial predators such as hawks and owls can be stopped with chicken wire and usually bird netting, though raccoons can climb and easily get through both chicken wire and netting. Dogs will take little time tearing through chicken wire at ground level. Electric fencing ratchets up security a several notches if installed properly with a strong charger and a good aluminum wire.

ETA: What Dmontgomery said about following the existing roof design on out is definitely a good plan. Looking at it it looks like roll-roofing???? I'm not sure about making the transition from asphalt to metal...I'm thinking you will need to drop the metal, coop-cover roofing down a few inches below the existing roof edge and use flashing to help seal against rain.
Best wishes,
Ed


I really like that idea. The existing roof is asphalt shingle with a gutter which drains towards the back of the barn. I have considered reorienting that gutter so it drains into a catchment at the front of the barn. I really like Dmontgomery's idea of following the slope of the existing roof, both for visual and convenience.

I had no idea that raccoons could get through chicken wire. Which means that I will have to redo the perimeter fencing or move the coop to the other side of the barn which is already fenced with 2x4 welded. That side is more exposed to the elements though, and gets pretty mucked up in the winter. It's also oriented away from the house, and I would feel better if I can just open the window in the morning and make sure everything is still standing. I can resuse the chicken wire for the roof though. I love the electric fencing idea! I have enough heavy fencing wire to have a strand on the top and the bottom of the sides of the enclosure... maybe even run a strand along the roof just for good measure.

I'm also wondering if for aesthetics, continuing the asphalt shingles down instead of using metal roofing may be better. Plus, who wouldn't love a 30 year chicken coop roof!!! :p
 

Intheswamp

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 25, 2009
2,373
112
256
South Alabama
Good point about the gutter!!! That's a lot of roof for rain to fall on...it's gotta go somewhere. Something that you might want to check out is a "roof washer" or "rain diverter" if you want to use the rain-water for the chickens. These items help to wash away some of the trash on the roof...bugs, bird poop, leaves, etc., before it enters your rain barrels or whatever...

Here is one that has been around for a while:
http://www.rainharvest.com/rain-harvesting-pty-downspout-first-flush-diverter.asp



Ed
 

MANNA-PRO

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