Run with or without top Please help!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Citychick42, Jul 31, 2010.

  1. Citychick42

    Citychick42 Out Of The Brooder

    31
    0
    22
    Jul 9, 2010
    I have a cute playhouse that we r converting into a chicken coop for 5 blr wyandotte pullets on the way. The playhouse is raised about 2 and a half feet off the ground. Our barn (very tall large garage) sits about 5 feet behind the playhouse. We have some old laundry poles that would make good fence posts. Oh! The playhouse also has a swing set post. This all sounds like it would be easy to build a run, but covering it would be a problem. We could probably cover part of it but I was wonduring if any part of the run needs to be covered? Any help? Need a run live in the city. thanks for any help!
     
  2. corancher

    corancher Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,079
    25
    244
    Apr 18, 2007
    Colorado
    I let my birds free range and lock them in at night. We still lose birds once in awhile to coyote, hawks, or owls.

    If you have owls or hawks nearby, then you may want to cover it or be prepared that you may lose some birds.
     
  3. Cloverleaf Farm

    Cloverleaf Farm Bearded Birds are Best

    10,367
    82
    328
    Sep 16, 2008
    Levan, UT
    Definitely cover it! I just use bird/deer netting to keep the hawks, owls, and eagles out...
     
  4. Citychick42

    Citychick42 Out Of The Brooder

    31
    0
    22
    Jul 9, 2010
    thanks! i dont think i can let my birds run free range due to laws codes ect.
     
  5. Citychick42

    Citychick42 Out Of The Brooder

    31
    0
    22
    Jul 9, 2010
    also i dont know if i need a frame for the top or if i can just stretch it from the barn to the playhouse.
     
  6. Cloverleaf Farm

    Cloverleaf Farm Bearded Birds are Best

    10,367
    82
    328
    Sep 16, 2008
    Levan, UT
    Quote:Depends on what you end up using. If you use something lightweight, like me, I just put a post in the middle to hold it up. If you use something heavy like chicken wire, you need a frame. How far is it needing to stretch?
     
  7. alaskachick

    alaskachick Chillin' With My Peeps

    349
    0
    109
    Jun 13, 2010
    Wasilla, Alaska
    We live in the woods where there are lots of hawks, black birds, etc. They sit in the trees and stare down at our chicken coop and yard licking their chops, however they can not swoop down and get a chicken because we used clothes line rope and made a spider web affect over the yard. We tied the rope from the roof of the coop to the fence posts that hold up the coop wire. We tied each rope one foot apart in one direction and then one foot apart the other direction which created a netting. The hawk may be able to dive in, but he can't get out with a chicken in his grasp as he needs to spread his wing to lift off and he is not able to fit thru the roping. He therefore has to let the chicken go in order to try and get out. We watched this happen and it was so cool. The chicken was a little ruffled up and stuned, but she lived to tell her sisters about her adventure.
     
  8. Citychick42

    Citychick42 Out Of The Brooder

    31
    0
    22
    Jul 9, 2010
    we were using super heavy 1/2 in. weelded wire for the coop but i think we will use a LOT lighter wire for the run. should the top be something like a 2" by 3 " and then the sides should be like a 1" by1"? Im a little confused.
     
  9. Citychick42

    Citychick42 Out Of The Brooder

    31
    0
    22
    Jul 9, 2010
    because we live more in a city enviroment there are less hawks but more racones possems and dogs.
     
  10. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

    20,301
    3,606
    496
    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    Where do you live? Is snow or ice going to be a problem? If so, you need to build something strong enough to stand up to that weight. How wide a span you need to cover is also important.

    Why do you want to cover it? Predator protection? If so, which predators? To keep it dry? Provide shade? Keep them from flying out? Different reasons have different sollutions.

    I just saw your list of predators. 2"x4" or 2"x3" welded wire will keep them out. I'd suggest at least 17 gauge wire, preferably 14 gauge. You can use these for your entire run, sides and top. I would also suggest adding smaller sized wire, something with 1" or less openings, to the bottom 18" or so of your run to keep the raccoons from reaching through to grab your chickens. Even light weight chicken wire seems to work pretty well for this as long as you also have the heavier welded wire, but don't count on chicken wire by itself to keep these predators out.

    Raccoons and possums can climb over a fence. They are most dangerous at night but they will sometimes come out in the daytime, especially just before dark. Some dogs can get over a pretty good fence if they want to bad enough and all these can dig under a fence. I'd suggest an apron of welded wire around your run to keep them from digging under.

    You can reduce (not eliminate but reduce) your risk by locking them up in a very secure coop at night (which I recommend anyway no matter how secure your run is) and not even covering your run. Many people operate on that principle, including me, but there are risks involved. There is no one right answer for everyone.

    Good luck!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by