Running Out of Options? Border Collie Patrol

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Smittenroade, Feb 1, 2011.

  1. Smittenroade

    Smittenroade Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 31, 2011
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    I see that many of you have run out of options in protecting your flock. If you live in the woods like me and have trouble with everything from bobcats, to owls, to even raccoons you may want to look into getting a border collie. I have trained my border collie, her name is Eva, to guard the chicken coop pretty much 24/7. It has worked out very well so far and absolutely nothing gets by her. It does take alot of patience, a bit of knowledge, precise timing and trust to train a dog to do this. As a forewarning, many dogs are not suited to guarding small animals, you may not want to try it with a terrier, hound dog or any kind of hunting dog. She has caught around 3-4 opposums so far in her guarding efforts and Im sure ran off many raccoons and coyotes. Also for you softies, this is a very humane way to catch predators because she either runs them off or in the opposums case causes them to play dead. She even protects my feed storage from pests by going in at regular intervals. Of course border collies are a herding dog and if they are too young they may try to herd the flock but this is easily broken if it is adressed early in your training. If you have any questions regarding training or anything feel free to ask, and I will do my best to answer.

    PS: Do not get a border collie if you live in the city with a small yard. You will more than likely be sorry.

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    Eva on patrol.

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    Last edited: Feb 1, 2011
  2. donnavee

    donnavee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is very cool, we don't have any dogs but I have always said if I decided to get one, it would be a Border Collie. Can she actually be trusted in with the chickens or must she stay outside of the fence? I have read even the best trained dogs can try to kill chickens.
     
  3. chkn

    chkn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 27, 2010
    Border collies love to work don't they?
     
  4. Smittenroade

    Smittenroade Chillin' With My Peeps

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    North East Texas
    I let them free range all the time while she is around and she will just lay down and watch them. Typically any dog will chase something if it starts running because their instict kicks in. However, this can and must be broken quickly and thoroughly. You must teach the dog what is family and what is not. You must take a ton of time to be around your chickens with your dog, they must realize harm to the chickens is just as bad as harm to any member of the pack. DO NOT let a dog practice dominance on your chickens either. The key is introduction early in the dogs life, and boundaries. Any behavior such as; tail perks up, crouching, chasing, mouthing, any kind of hunting positioning MUST be corrected quickly and accurately. This training will be harder depending on your dogs personality, some dogs hunting instinct is much more prevalent and some have a more nurturing protective side. Remember trust is key, if you cant trust your dog completely with the chickens don't have them together. Dogs will know if your'e nervous with them around and will read it. Like Caesar Millan sais, "Calm and Assertive". [​IMG]
     
  5. Smittenroade

    Smittenroade Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 31, 2011
    North East Texas
    Oh she LOVES to work, the more the better. That is part of the training. Keeping her focused and on task is key to stopping any unwanted behavior.
     

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