Runny nose going around.

Tamiame

In the Brooder
Sep 29, 2018
10
15
34
Tioga, TX
There has been a runny nose issue going around on my flock. One hen is having a hard time breathing still. I think she may have started it but she still lays. Another hen had it for a week and recovered. I have a another one who is lethargic, running nose and not eating much. Any suggestions.
 

Wyorp Rock

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There has been a runny nose issue going around on my flock. One hen is having a hard time breathing still. I think she may have started it but she still lays. Another hen had it for a week and recovered. I have a another one who is lethargic, running nose and not eating much. Any suggestions.
Do you have photos?
How old are the hens?
Have you gotten any new chickens within the last 30 days?

From your description, you are dealing with a respiratory disease. Mycoplasma and Infectious Bronchitis are fairly common. If they have a foul odor about their head, then it could be Infectious Coryza.

Since there is respiratory distress, then you probably need to see if she will respond to antibiotics. You can find injectable Tylan50 at most feed stores. Dosage is .20ml per pound of weight given orally 3 times a day for 5 days. If you can only give it 2 times a day, bump up the dosage to .30ml per pound of weight.

Do keep in mind, as you are finding out, respiratory diseases are contagious. Even if birds recover, they remain carriers of the disease. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044

What are you goals with these chickens?
 

Tamiame

In the Brooder
Sep 29, 2018
10
15
34
Tioga, TX
Do you have photos?
How old are the hens?
Have you gotten any new chickens within the last 30 days?

From your description, you are dealing with a respiratory disease. Mycoplasma and Infectious Bronchitis are fairly common. If they have a foul odor about their head, then it could be Infectious Coryza.

Since there is respiratory distress, then you probably need to see if she will respond to antibiotics. You can find injectable Tylan50 at most feed stores. Dosage is .20ml per pound of weight given orally 3 times a day for 5 days. If you can only give it 2 times a day, bump up the dosage to .30ml per pound of weight.

Do keep in mind, as you are finding out, respiratory diseases are contagious. Even if birds recover, they remain carriers of the disease. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044

What are you goals with these chickens?
 

Tamiame

In the Brooder
Sep 29, 2018
10
15
34
Tioga, TX
I have just started my flock. My neighbor bought a flock from someone a while back. I think my flock caught it from hers. So I've started my hen on tylan 50. What are the issues with keeping a flock of carriers.
 

meetthebubus

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Mar 28, 2017
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I'm not an expert but i see you are in TX you probably have a lot of warm weather? I do too, if thats the case the weather change can give the sneezes to chickens in this type of climate that's usually dry. I provide a water choice of one fresh, one with chicken oregano/cinnamon vitamins, and one with vet rx.

Anyone showing signs gets vet rx personally as well mine were over t in a couple days sorry but on here I always see cull, cull drama drama it's not always the case just sayin, though I'm not trying to diminish anyone's opinion just in a hurry
 

Wyorp Rock

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I have just started my flock. My neighbor bought a flock from someone a while back. I think my flock caught it from hers. So I've started my hen on tylan 50. What are the issues with keeping a flock of carriers.
Well....your birds will always be carriers regardless even if some never show symptoms of illness. They can spread the illness to any new birds that you bring in. New birds are also considered carriers.
As you have found, it can be spread among flocks - if your neighbor had it, now you do too - these illnesses are spread through the air, dirt, dust, dander, shoes, clothes, shared tools and equipment.

Respiratory diseases also impact egg production and egg quality, certain ones also can damage the oviduct and be the cause or reproductive problems. Bird can also relapse during times of stress, so you would need to keep a close watch and manage symptoms.

A lot depends on the illness, but there can be a reduction in egg hatchability, an increase in chick mortality and some illnesses are spread to the embryo of the eggs as well.

Selling/trading/giving away hatching eggs, chicks or chickens would be something you would not want to do. You don't want to spread that to some one else unless.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
 

Wyorp Rock

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Southern N.C. Mountains
I'm not an expert but i see you are in TX you probably have a lot of warm weather? I do too, if thats the case the weather change can give the sneezes to chickens in this type of climate that's usually dry. I provide a water choice of one fresh, one with chicken oregano/cinnamon vitamins, and one with vet rx.

Anyone showing signs gets vet rx personally as well mine were over t in a couple days sorry but on here I always see cull, cull drama drama it's not always the case just sayin, though I'm not trying to diminish anyone's opinion just in a hurry

Cull, Cull, Drama, Drama?
Can you explain that a little more?

When dealing with disease - culling is something that does need to be considered. It is not mentioned that often since most people won't cull sick birds to begin with.
I don't see where culling was even suggested to the OP in this thread. Asking what their goals are is important. If the OP was going to sell/breed/trade/give away hatching eggs, chicks, chickens - then they have some decisions to make.
Most people don't even realize that respiratory diseases make birds carriers for life - these diseases, even when birds have recovered, impact other aspects of the chicken's health.
Some people simply don't care and continue to spread whatever illness their flock may have, blowing it off as a "cold".

The OP reports sneezing with mucous, lethargy, not eating and respiratory distress. That to me if respiratory disease, not an occasional snick/sneeze from dry weather, dust or getting food in the nostrils. It's possible that the VetRx may offer some type of relief, but it's not going to cure them, just like antibiotics won't cure them.
Sometimes the best one can do is "manage" symptoms.

Just my 2¢
 

Eggcessive

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Apr 3, 2011
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Most professional poultry books and articles recommend culling sick chickens. Oldtimers with farm chickens culled chickens who seemed sick, and had them for dinner, or they did not live long enough to get diseases.

This website is a friendly one, many with backyard chickeners asking advice for a pet, and most of us usually point out that culling is a way to stop disease spread, since respiratory diseases make carriers of the whole flock. But many want advice on treating, and if you take them to a vet, they usually prescribe antibiotics even though most are not approved in egg layers due to residuals. But many will choose to medicate a pet chicken, just like a dog or cat. It is up to the person. And Wyorp Rock has answered the OP well.

Antibiotic resistance has happened due to large poultry, cattle, and pig farms lacing the feed with preventative antibiotics willy nilly, just so they don’t have to deal with illnesses and losses. I have on occasion used Tylan on a single bird, but would not use antibiotics unnecessarily, often, or without knowing just what I was treating. But when people ask what treatments are available, I will answer questions. I may not follow that advice personally, but some will do all they can for a pet.
 

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