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Runny nostrils...

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by LosOsosChick, Oct 16, 2013.

  1. LosOsosChick

    LosOsosChick Out Of The Brooder

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    Los Osos
    What do you think could be wrong with my young easter egger, Gwenie? For a couple of days she's been having clear discharge from her nostrils. Other than that, she seems fine, though she and her best friend have taken to sleeping on a separate roost at night, away from the other girls. She is my smallest girl, and she just started laying a few weeks ago and has seemed to be in great health up until now. Is it normal for pullets to get colds? Or is this something I should be concerned about? TIA!
     
  2. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Sounds to me like she has a mild respiratory diseases (chickens don't get colds like humans, they get respiratory infections which can be serious). Sometimes chicken respiratory problems can be treated by giving supportive care, just like you would to a human with a cold.I'd isolate her away from any other chickens in a warm, clean place. Put some vitamins in her water, and encourage her to eat plenty (if she isn't).

    If she doesn't seem to recover, or gets worse, then you may need to treat with an antibiotic. Good choices include Oxytetracycline (Terramycin, Tetroxy HCA-280, etc.) and Tylan50 injectable (it comes in a water soluble form, but I prefer the injectable). You can usually find those antibiotics at a livestock supply store, like TSC. The Oxytetracycline dosage is 2 teaspoons per gallon of drinking water for 7-14 days. The Tylan50 injectable dosage is 1cc for large-fowl, .5ccs for bantams, injected into one side of the breast once daily for 5 days. Alternate the side of the breast that you inject into, and use a small gauge needle, as Tylan tends to make the injection area sore. Do not give dairy products, probiotics, or apple cider vinegar during antibiotic treatment.

    The only other cause of the discharge that I can think of is if your coop is dusty or has a strong concentration of ammonia. Both of those things can cause respiratory irritation.

    Hope I've helped, and your pullet recovers!
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. stevetone

    stevetone Chicken Advocate

    We have had great success in misting our birds with a mild concentration of Oxine, making sure that they having ample opportunity to breathe in the vapor. The mist must be very fine, like a vaporizer would produce, and applied at the first sign of symptoms.

    When we have used this technique, it has cured every one of our respiratory issues, knock on wood!

    (But I do agree with the above drug therapies to treat real bad cases)
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. LosOsosChick

    LosOsosChick Out Of The Brooder

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    Los Osos
    Oh dear! This sounds far more serious than I thought. I'd better give Gwenie some special TLC... I'd hate to lose her, she is one of my favorite birds, so sweet and personable, and one of the two who we raised from little chicklets.
     
  5. LosOsosChick

    LosOsosChick Out Of The Brooder

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    Are respiratory infections contagious? It's been very warm here during the day, do you think it would be all right to let her run around with the other girls during the day, and then bring her inside at night? Poor thing seems upset to be separated from her friends.
     
  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Yes, respiratory infections/diseases are contageous. Before panicking, I would first check for something in the environment causing the runny nostrils, such as; feed dust, pollen, ammonia fumes from soiled bedding, improper ventilation, pesticides, etc....
    If it's not environmental and there are no other symptoms and no other birds are showing symptoms, it could be something fungal. In this case I suggest you follow the advice in post #3 by Stevetone.
     
  7. LosOsosChick

    LosOsosChick Out Of The Brooder

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    Los Osos
    I listened to the collective advice and isolated my sick girl, she's been snug and warm in a brooder inside the house since yesterday. Added vitamins to her water... this afternoon she seemed quite chipper, and her nostrils seemed better, I was really feeling optimistic until I noticed the bubbles in the corner of one of her eyes. [​IMG]

    None of the other pullets are showing any symptoms at this point. I have no idea which of the many treatments recommended in this thread and other related threads that I've searched would be appropriate for her, so I'm considering asking a vet this weekend. I'm so inexperienced with raising chickens, having only been at it for five months, and I'd hate to give her the wrong medication, or not treat her condition the right way.

    Feeling anxious and sad...
     
  8. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm sorry that things aren't looking good for your pullet. [​IMG] If I remember my diseases correctly, bubbles in the eye is a sign of Chronic Respiratory Disease/Mycoplasma. While usually not too serious, CRD is long lasting, and will stay in your flock forever, reappearing during times of stress.
     

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