Sad night. Last chick hatched, egg-topsied the rest.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by hmlongino, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. hmlongino

    hmlongino Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 12, 2009
    Fayetteville, GA
    I had 14 fully formed chicks (that I candled and were alive at day 18) that were unpipped and drowned in liquid.

    My humidity was 65% at lockdown, however.... we had some early hatching the very next day. The first chick hatched on day 19... shooting the humidity up to 85-94%.

    I tried to get it down, but we had 13 chicks hatch by the night of day 20, and the humidity stayed high.

    My theory:

    Any chick that was pipped near days 19 were safe. Any that were not, drowned on days 20-21.


    I am so very sad.

    I need to know how to get humidity DOWN when it spikes during an early hatch. I will definitely be lowering my hatch humidity, of course, but when chicks hatch, it really shoots up.

    What a sad night. [​IMG]
     
  2. kvmommy

    kvmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 2, 2011
    I'm no expert but I was told (since I had problems like that) that the drowning in liquid is because the humidity was too during the incubation and not during hatching. BUT...since you had so many hatch and did have such high humidity I'd guess you're probably right.
     
  3. tec27

    tec27 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ya it seems like your humidity wasn't right throughout the entire incubation. I've never had high humidity problems so i can't really help you on how to fix that. Usually its the other way around
     
  4. oldorchardfarms

    oldorchardfarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 26, 2011
    woodstock
    what i did when my went up was cracked the bator for a few seconds that really brought it down, but watch the temp dont go down too much and only do this if some are hatched
     
  5. BasicallyHeather

    BasicallyHeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2011
    Lowellville, Ohio
    I am so sorry for your loss [​IMG] Hopefully next time will go much better for you, and this experience doesn't prevent you from trying again.
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Northwest Arkansas
    The only two ways I know to control humidity are are to reduce the surface area of the liquid or vent some of it out. When wet chicks are hatching, that surface area can really go up, so open vent holes if you have them available. I don't know what your incubator looks like or any practical way of covering part of the surface of the water when it shoots up like that during hatch.

    You are looking at them and I'm not, so I am not trying to start an argument. I'd be a bit surprised if high humidity like that actually caused unpipped eggs to drown that late in incubation. Are you sure they were getting enough oxygen? Those developing chicks need to breathe through the egg shell. With all that biomass in there, unless you were getting a flow of air through there, they may not have been getting enough? If you have a forced air, this is probably not it, but maybe something to consider if you have a still air. Maybe another reason to open all vent holes, which you probably did anyway.
     
  7. hmlongino

    hmlongino Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Fayetteville, GA
    You know, like so many things in life,
    this is more an art than a science!

    I am not giving up--- I know I'll get it down eventually!
    For now, I will be thankful for the 12 I have (lost one that was sticky) and learn, learn, learn!
     
  8. reereechickens

    reereechickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 12, 2011
    Reidsville, NC
    Hi! Sorry for your loss, I know it sucks to have a bad hatch! I started having better results when I tried Pete55 method of hatching. He has a lot of info. Some of the info is on other types of birds but for the most part it applies to chickens.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=7493364#p7493364

    On his BYC page he has ALL of his links, it is overwhelming at first but worth the effort![​IMG]
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    This link is a long thread, but it has a lot of information on the effects of humidity during the entire incubation process. It has some information that may help you understand the eggtopsy. Since you mentioned learning, I'll offer it.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=491421

    I agree with you. There is a lot of art in it, especially since we all have different conditions, even inside out incubators. But some science doesn't hurt.
     
  10. hmlongino

    hmlongino Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Fayetteville, GA
    Thanks so much!

    I was so stuck on the "don't EVER open the bator during a HATCH or death and destruction and shrink wrapping and DEATH will happen!!!!" advice I've always read. Everyone always seems so passionate about it that it affected my judgement. Bottom line-- not every situation is the same (actually, I bet none of them ever are!) and I need to learn enough and have enough practice to make calls on my own.

    I will read up and try again! [​IMG]
     

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