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Saddle to protect pullet

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by wamtazlady, Oct 7, 2015.

  1. wamtazlady

    wamtazlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2013
    Kalispell MT
    I have 14 pullets and 2 cockerels. I didn't mean to have 2 cockerels but got one as my free mystery chick from MMH and the grandson immediately fell in love with him. The problem I am having is just one pullet. Apparently Red, my Rhode Island Red is the sexiest thing alive and her back is starting to show it. No one else has any feather damage. I am considering a saddle for her but don't know how long she can wear it. We're snowbirds and will be heading south for the winter in Nov. We'll have a house sitter living here and talking care of the flock. I want to make things as easy as possible for her as she is not used to taking care of chickens. If Red can't wear the saddle until we return in May then I can't put one on my sexy pullet.
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    Roosters will favor lower ranking hens and wear them out, I personally would rehome your roosters especially if you aren't going to be around, you can't just put a hen saddle on and leave it, it could rub on her, and they are more prone to mites because they can't dust bathe as well. It isn't fair to the hens.
     
  3. wamtazlady

    wamtazlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2013
    Kalispell MT
    Thank you. I had a feeling a saddle could not be left on for very long.
     
  4. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    I also don't know how old your roosters are but unless you are familiar with dominance behavior most roosters will eventually come after there keepers if you don't recognize the signs and body language of a rooster, it would be unfair to your house sitter to find out the hard way that your roosters have decided to try to dominate them and you are not in the position to come home to fix it. It wouldn't be a good situation. Sorry.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2015

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