Safe plants for shade on the run

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by keiferlou, May 4, 2016.

  1. keiferlou

    keiferlou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What are some safe plants I can put along the sunny side of the chicken run that will vine or climb up to provide them a little shade in the hotter months? Flowering or non-flowering doesn't really matter but if it attracts some bugs for them to snack on, I'm sure they wouldn't mind one bit.
     
  2. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    Anything that they can reach through the wire is likely to be eaten. I have noticed that the rasberry canes grow high enough before growing through the fence that they are mainly out of reach.
     
  3. Bram

    Bram Out Of The Brooder

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    keiferlou, did you find something for shade? I think I'd like to try that too!
     
  4. keiferlou

    keiferlou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I did! I planted honeysuckle, a grape vine (died quickly thanks to my dog digging it out) and clematis. None have been bothered by chickens, ducks or geese surprisingly. The honeysuckle is taking off just how I wanted and climbing right on up.
     
  5. Donna R Raybon

    Donna R Raybon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Traditional tree to plant for shade is mulberry. Chickens love the dropped berries.
     
  6. keiferlou

    keiferlou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I actually considered mullberries but couldn't find any when I went shopping. That will go on the list for next year.
     
  7. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

    just passin by and saw this thread.... I would have suggested mulberries too.

    If you were in a warmer climate I might suggest oranges or lemons too. As long as you can protect the drip line from digging from the chickens.

    We grow Star Jasmine which is a vine here and has awesome flowers and shade producing foliage. I don't know if it grows in your climate.

    Just about any fruit tree would provide shade in the summer. I would pick stone fruit because the seed part isnt easy to swallow. With the exception of cherries. I dont know if cherry pits have any noxious properties.

    One thing you can do is use a net below the fruit bearing tree to preserve the fruit that drops for your own table.

    Something you can grow for your chickens consumption is Kale.... grow it along side the run they will keep it pruned as far as they can reach then you can trinm it and feed it to them as well.

    Just do yourself a favor and check the list of toxic plants there are a few here on BYC.

    Some are deadly some are only toxic if eaten in great quantities. but its good to be aware of them all. Regional variations will apply.... some stuff wont grow in cold climates. some stuff wont grow in dry climates


    deb
     
  8. keiferlou

    keiferlou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for your input [​IMG] I chose honeysuckle because I know it grows very well here in Oklahoma and it grows fast. I've read things that say it is safe and things that say it's not and was prepared to yank them if they got interested in them just in case but they don't even look at them or the clematis. Jasmine was on my list too but I also couldn't find any of that. I found phlox on a safe list last summer and planted some by my gate just for some pretty color and my Bantam hen found it and demolished it the same day. She never ventures that far but she did that day. She LOVES phlox apparently! I hadn't thought about kale! I know they love lettuce but I've never tried them with kale. I will have to try it and see if they like it. Might add some kale next year!
     

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