Safe to dip eggs in Oxine or Tylan?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by foxypoproxy, Dec 15, 2011.

  1. foxypoproxy

    foxypoproxy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So i just had to put down my flock the other day because they had CRD.
    I'm heartbroken and trying to plan for hatching eggs in the spring.
    I'm super paranoid that i could possibly buy infected eggs.
    I heard that you can dip hatching eggs in Oxine or Tylan and that will help prevent any diseases in the chick.
    I know that if you wash an egg with water, it washes the bloom off and makes it more susceptible to bacteria....
    Would dipping in oxine or tylan also wash the bloom off?
    Does this method work?
    I don't want to have to go through this horrible ordeal again, so any information would be appreciated!
     
  2. stephanie1992

    stephanie1992 Chillin' With My Peeps

    i washed my eggs in antibacteral soap in cold water. and there all developing fine. ive never done the wasing in oxine or tylan before
     
  3. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Google, "dipping eggs before incubation," and you will get many hits. Lots of good info.

    ETA: I would not use "cold" water to do this. Below copied from
    http://www.guineafowlinternational.org/articles/washing.php

    Egg washing has to be done properly, for reasons already explained. Cold water causes the egg contents to shrink, allowing the water AND the bacteria it contains to be pulled into the egg. Warm (or even hot) water makes the egg contents expand and press against the shell (I always picture this like a balloon being blown up inside a sieve), thus preventing the bacteria from entering the pores of the egg. And after washing, eggs should only be handled with clean hands (or even sterile gloves).

    You should wash them as soon as possible after collection, then set them into clean trays until you are ready to incubate. However, most home incubator people seem to wait until they are ready to set the eggs before they wash them. I think it depends on where and how you store the eggs.​
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2011
  4. foxypoproxy

    foxypoproxy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:
    I did google it, but i only found like one thread that pertains to what im talking to and i wondered if there was anymore information on it.
     
  5. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Quote:
    I did google it, but i only found like one thread that pertains to what im talking to and i wondered if there was anymore information on it.

    hmmmm, I had lots of hits. Many articles on the subject. [​IMG]
     
  6. foxypoproxy

    foxypoproxy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I did google it, but i only found like one thread that pertains to what im talking to and i wondered if there was anymore information on it.

    hmmmm, I had lots of hits. Many articles on the subject. [​IMG]

    I'll try again then, maybe i wasn't looking enough [​IMG]
     
  7. foxypoproxy

    foxypoproxy Chillin' With My Peeps

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  8. MudgesMom

    MudgesMom Out Of The Brooder

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    We used these tylan egg dipping solutions and they worked well. The first link is more helpful for dipping the eggs.The recipes are given for grams of tylan. Having a gram scale is helpful, I don't remember offhand what that measures out to converting to teaspoons. The procedure is very easy and a lot less complicated than it looks. There is an even more effective drug that will treat MG but I have to look back in my research to find it. CRD covers many diseases and tylan is effective with most but not all. I'm not sure which CRD illness your dealing with. If I can find it (the studies for effective treatments concerning different types of CRD) I'll put it up but it will take me awhile to find it. Family coming into town.

    Happy dipping!!!!!!!


    http://www.poultryswapontario.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1411




    http://msucares.com/poultry/diseases/solutions.html
     
  9. foxypoproxy

    foxypoproxy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:We aren't sure what CRD we our dealing with either.
    We our waiting for the necropsy results, but we know its not MG but it was suspected to be MS.
    Either way, we didn't have any fertile eggs from our flock before they were put down [​IMG] so i will be buying shipped eggs.
    I just want to make sure i take every precaution preventing CRD.
    Thank you so much for posting!
    I like to hear from people who have first hand experience trying it.
    Do you know if dipping the eggs in tylan affects the bloom coating the egg at all?
    I guess it doesn't if people still have success hatching.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2011
  10. Gypsy07

    Gypsy07 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Washing eggs in antibacterial solution will prevent anything nasty entering the egg from outside after it's been laid. However if there was any bacteria/disease in the parent flock that was passed on to the egg by the hen before the egg was laid, washing will not make any difference to this.

    I wash all my hatching eggs in hot bleach whether they are visibly dirty or not. I've kept records of all hatches and it has definitely improved my hatch rate. All commercial hatcheries wash their eggs, and they wouldn't be doing that if it didn't earn them more money, i.e. hatch them more chicks.

    If you're worried about any new chicks catching the same thing that your previous birds had, you should also be disposing of any unused feed/bedding/wood shavings you still have and thoroughly disinfecting any feeders/waterers coops that you're intending to use again. If you had penned birds that didn't free range, it might be a good idea to move your run to a different spot, as some bacteria will remain active in the soil for a long time...
     

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