Salmon Faverolle Pullet Attacked

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by lemondsm, Oct 6, 2011.

  1. lemondsm

    lemondsm Chillin' With My Peeps

    115
    0
    99
    Aug 9, 2010
    Yulee, FL
    Hi everyone,

    I have seen many horror stories on here about the many predators that can attack our chickens. I knew there were risks but naively thought we didn't have any to fear where we live.

    I have 3 pullets in a quaratine cage (metal dog kennel on the ground). I had provided them a couple of roosts but noticed the other night that they were sleeping on the lowest roost against the side of the cage. The thought crossed my mind that I should do something but then dismissed it because we have never had any problems with any predators. We have actually never seen any snakes, raccoons, foxes, coyotes or any birds of prey. However, our neighbor recently cleaned out her barn and she said there were tons of rats for us to keep an eye out that they may come towards our house. For a week or so we were fine but all of a sudden we found rat droppings in the garage (which has a manual door and isn't sealed). We immediately took all of the animal feed out of the garage and tried to eliminate any hiding spots and set traps. We haven't seen any signs of them in the last couple of days. This morning when I checked on my chickens I walked up to my quarantine cage to find a large amount of feathers outside of the cage and one patch of feathers with a small piece of meat attached. I immediately looked to see if the pullets were all alive and they were. It appears whatever it was attacked only one of my salmon faverolles. She looked scared but alive. She has a gruesome looking wounding at the lower part of her shoulder just were the top of her wing attaches. I have separated her and protected the other chickens but I am wondering first what you think it was and how should I treat her? Neosporin? I have never had a chicken attacked (well I take that back one pullet hopped the fence free ranging and the neighbors dog killed her but nothing on our property) so I am not prepared with a chicken first aid kit. Now I have read several posts about raccoons but based on what I have read it is likely the raccoon wouldn't have given up. Is it possible since I moved my chicken food out of the garage that a rat could have done this? I have only seen posts about rats attacking chicks. Any help? This is completely my fault. I should of reinforced the quarantine cage with wire mesh.
     
  2. Cloverleaf Farm

    Cloverleaf Farm Bearded Birds are Best

    10,367
    82
    328
    Sep 16, 2008
    Levan, UT
    Yep, a rat would do that. A friend of mine lost a full grown hen to a rat a couple years ago. Clean it twice daily with dilute Betadine solution for the first few days, and in between cleaning it, keep neosporin on it. I would also put her on Tetracycline in her water, you can get a pouch of the powdered tetracycline at most feed stores. [​IMG] Good luck with her!
     
  3. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

    5,719
    42
    283
    May 8, 2007
    Wisconsin
    I've used the plain Neosporin without pain medication on minor chicken wounds.

    It does sound like it may have been one of the rats. Keep trying to get rid of them, even if you aren't seeing them, in case they're still lurking around. I don't like using poison, but I'd be putting some out in the garage. I really don't like rats.
     
  4. Chicken_Pauper

    Chicken_Pauper Chillin' With My Peeps

    493
    10
    111
    Mar 8, 2011
    Southern California
    I like Blu-Kote due to the fact that it is an antibacterial, anti-fungal, etc... and gives a coating to protect and help to heal.

    I would isolate her, gently clean the would with clean water, pat dry, spray with Blu-Kote (available at the feed store).... keep her warm and dry. Feed her some extra treats like scrambled eggs and yogurt. The water soluable antibiotics (Tetracycline also called Duran 10) is powdered and you add 1 teaspoon per gallon (the amount of water to be consumed in 24 hours...) or, I have added 1/2 a teaspoon to a quart of water to put into a cage with an injured bird)... give it three days (change each day). Follow Blu-Kote directions.

    I would look around for "tracks".. slither lines or footprints to see what was out there. Rats seem to be your number one suspect, so continue to glue trap or snap trap them.

    Be sure to check all the chickens all over, under and around to see if there are ANY other cuts, scrapes or wounds. Even a small one should be sprayed a bit with Blu-Kote. Use a Q-Tip or cotton ball sprayed with Blu-Kote for around the eyes or head respectively.

    Have to find a way to keep them warm and dry and safe and quiet at night... so the predator(s) can't get them or even scare them. Every night. Now, they've "had a taste" and will come back for more.

    Good luck.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 7, 2011
  5. lemondsm

    lemondsm Chillin' With My Peeps

    115
    0
    99
    Aug 9, 2010
    Yulee, FL
    Thank you all for the feedback. She is doing okay so far. I have set more traps for those nasty rats. Although I haven't seen hide nor hair (or should I say rat poopies) of them since the other day.
     
  6. mrpekinduck

    mrpekinduck Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 29, 2011
    Ducky Land!
    I hope shes ok! [​IMG] I'm sorry but it was probably a rat. Ugh nasty creatures. [​IMG] Put half in. wire over the cage and set the traps so you can rid of those little buggers! [​IMG]
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    29,271
    3,312
    491
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    A friend of mine is an exterminator and he told me there are different breeds of rats that are meat eaters, and those that only want the chicken feed. The meet eaters will go after the chickens, so 1/2 inch hardware cloth is about the only thing to keep them out. Pretty scary.
     
  8. lemondsm

    lemondsm Chillin' With My Peeps

    115
    0
    99
    Aug 9, 2010
    Yulee, FL
    Thank you all for the help and feedback. She is doing good so far. Her wound seems to be healing and she is eating well.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by