Sandy is she out of the woods?? Update

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jtfever, Jan 25, 2017.

  1. jtfever

    jtfever New Egg

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    From my 5 lovely chickens, one of them started to show signs of being sick, her name is Sandy, one of my Speckled Sussex. One day when I was free ranging the girls I saw Sandy limping - I picked her up to check on her to see if there were signs of bumblefoot. I did a thorough inspection but she did not seem to have anything broken or anything wrong although I did notice that her belly was very large, and it felt soft.. Perhaps eggbound? I then let her go back to the coop until I purchased the necessary supplies to try and remedy the eggbound condition, soaking her in a warm bath with Epsom salt to see if she would pass an egg, hoping that she was egg bound and not any other serious condition.

    The 2nd day, I placed her in the warm bath for 20m and didn't see any change, so A) She is not egg bound dealing with a disease. Or B) She needed more time to pass the egg. After the second try to place her in a warm bath I realized that she was definitely not egg bound, plus she completely lost the ability to used her legs. I was scared and trying to keep my cool because these girls are part of my life. How can I let them down?

    The 3rd day, I started to panic after looking online, every symptom she had was pointing to death row. I then decided to make her some organic meds, cayenne pepper, garlic, apple cider vinegar, and ginger. I had to feed her w/a syringe because she was not eating much. Her tail was down which is not a good sign and she was not moving from her spot for hours.

    The 4th day, She could only stand up just for a few seconds then continued to lay back down. Perhaps the organic spices are doing something?? I decided to take her to my vet that specialize in avian and exotic pets, especially chickens. The reason for this visit was to A) To find out if she would make it and what are my choices. Or B) So I could know if it was contagious. So I could take appropriate actions and treat my other hens.

    I was sitting in the waiting room waiting for my turn, thinking the Dr was going to give me bad news.. I was not prepared for that! It was going to be a sad day for me. Waiting I felt my throat closing down, just not ready to face what the Dr was going to tell me. I was called into the room and the nurse asked me "So what is Sandy in for? How is she doing?" I broke down in tears, I could not face anything other than good news for her, my heart was sinking. I could not speak to the nurse at all. After I got it together, I told her what was going on.

    So the Dr came into the room to inspect her and told me she has Egg Coelomitis, one of the diseases I read on the internet - (Egg yolk Coelomitis is another common sequela of chronic reproductive disease. It can occur after salpingo- hysterectomy because of the inability to completely remove the ovary and the potential for ovulation to occur into the coelomic cavity. Egg yolk, along with bacteria in the Coelomic cavity results in infection. Egg yolk Coelomitis causes a severe inflammatory reaction and can lead to an egg-related pancreatitis or a yolk emboli (which can resemble a stroke).
    What are my options?? I was super happy that I could at least be w/her and take care of her. She prescribed antibiotic and anti-inflammatory meds.
    Furthermore, if she does not respond to the meds she may not have Coelomitis but a tumor or kidney disease, so making her comfortable would be the only thing I could do. However, she is not there yet, crossing my fingers that this is not the end for her.

    The meds, did I mention they are pills?? I told the Dr, "how in the world was she going to take pills if she was not eating much?" - The Dr was kind enough to show me how it's done and surprisingly I gave her the first dose in front of her to make sure I am doing it right!
    She told me you have to open her beak w/your left hand and hold the pill on your right hand, you put your index finger in her throat (yeah not easy at all) and drop the pill in her mouth. I have to do this for 14 days - so twice a day, well three times since there are 3 pills the antibiotic is given twice a day and the anti-inflammatory once.

    The 5fth day, she was feeling way better, I am not losing hope now!! She was still weak not eating much. I had to do something about her eating - so I bought probiotic, electrolyte and vitamin supplement at Tractor supply. I mixed the water with all of the ingredients I bought with spaghetti and rice, she was eating!! I open the dog crate (keeping her in the dining room) she was limping but could hold her body more!! I was so happy!!

    The 6th day, I turned on the light and she was standing on both legs!! she gained movement on her left leg!! That same day I took her out with the rest. Caroline (one of my brave hens, top of the pecking order) wanted to fight her, definitely, something totally natural called the Pecking Order - understanding that she has been gone for 6 days, away from her sisters for a while. She has much more energy she was running when she saw the coop, I know she wants to be with the others, feeling normal, scratching, just being herself not cooped up inside. I feel for her my lovely Sandy, she knows I am only doing this for her own good, loving on her is all she holds on to at home. I am praying that this journey it is all going to be worth it!

    I am only hoping from this 7th day that it will be ok and that she will be much better by the end of the week - bc we are not out of the woods yet. Praying for my lovely hen Sandy, she is my sweet girl..

    I wanted to share my experience with you since I have not many chicken friends that love their hens like you all do.



    ##Update##


    The 13th day, In summary for the past week, she was not eating much or drinking, this was the side effect of the antibiotics.The blood work they did @ the vet came back normal, the bacterial infection was gone, Sandy is back to normal and back with the others... She is a tough cookie! She is the second in the pecking order now :)


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    Thanks,
    Tery
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2017
  2. MasterOfClucker

    MasterOfClucker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Welcome to BYC!


    Im glad she improved!.Are you sure he said Egg Coelomitis?.Never heard of it are you sure he didn't say egg yolk peritonitis?Which can cause a swollen abdomen due to the overload of eggs in the coelmotic cavity.If you have any problems again fill free to post in the emergency and disease section here on BYC.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2017
  3. jtfever

    jtfever New Egg

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  4. jtfever

    jtfever New Egg

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    Thank you! The vet wrote on the analysis - Egg Yolk Coelomitis not sure if she meant egg yolk peritonitis..
     
  5. MasterOfClucker

    MasterOfClucker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeah.I just looked up Egg Yolk Coelomitis nothing came up for it.Its probably just another term i guess.This will be very helpful to others with the same problem.Thank you for posting.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2017
  6. jtfever

    jtfever New Egg

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    I found it and looks like the same explanation she gave me. (merckvetmanual.com/exotic-and-laboratory-animals/pet-birds/reproductive-diseases-of-pet-birds) I can't post links on this page.
     
  7. jtfever

    jtfever New Egg

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    I can't post links on this page - but I did find results and looks to be what she explained to me. :)
     
  8. MasterOfClucker

    MasterOfClucker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What antibiotic did she get?In most cases birds with Egg peritonitis are culled.
     
  9. jtfever

    jtfever New Egg

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    Reading the bottle SMZ-TMP 480mg. Surgery mayb needed if the inflammation starts again. She just finished the anti-inflammatory med. I will keep the site posted with any updates.
     
  10. jtfever

    jtfever New Egg

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    Here is the info online gathered by a Vet manual:

    Egg yolk coelomitis is another common sequela of chronic reproductive disease. It can occur after salpingohysterectomy because of the inability to completely remove the ovary and the potential for ovulation to occur into the coelomic cavity. Other causes are ectopic ovulation, salpingitis, neoplasia, cystic hyperplasia, or ruptured oviduct. Egg yolk, along with bacteria (eg, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus) in the coelomic cavity results in infection. Egg yolk coelomitis causes a severe inflammatory reaction and can lead to an egg-related pancreatitis or a yolk emboli (which can resemble a stroke). This occurs most commonly in cockatiels.
    Clinical signs are similar to other reproductive disorders, but typically abdominal distention and ascites are present. Birds often present severely compromised and require supportive care before diagnostic testing. A leukocytosis and monocytosis may be present. Imaging (radiographs or ultrasound) may reveal an enlarged oviduct or a fluid-filled abdomen. Endoscopic examination may be diagnostic but should be done only by an experienced clinician in a bird with ascites. Abdominocentesis may need to be performed to relieve dyspnea. Other treatments include fluids, antibiotics, analgesics, anti-inflammatories, a warm incubator, and oxygen as needed. Many birds will improve with supportive care and antibiotics, but some may require salpingohysterectomy. Prognosis is fair with medical management and becomes guarded to grave with surgical intervention.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2017

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