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sans Miss Hiss

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by ivan3, Jul 6, 2007.

  1. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Jan 27, 2007
    BOCOMO
    Both our turkey hens went broody a couple of weeks ago. Both were nesting in their predator proofed chainlinked pen. The gate was open during the day when one of us was here, but locked every evening. What we didn't count on was the Royal hen working on a secondary nest (during the day and on the sly) thirty yards out in the woods (she was back every evening for lockdown and was around most of the day).
    She was attacked, during the day, while out on her secret nest. As it rained most of last week, any blood was washed away and she was back on her protected clutch in the evening (didn't suspect she was injured). By Sunday morning I noticed that she'd flown back into the main pen (six ft. fence) and was standing with her wings held low in the turkey shed and I thought she was just avoiding the rain but, after thirty minutes of not changing position, I went out to check. I picked her up and was immediately hit with the smell of rotting flesh and noticed tiny maggots working the back of her neck (no injury apparent, however). We placed her in the bathtub and poured warm water/betadine solution over her. The maggots and dead skin just fell off in clumps! She'd been terribly gashed on the right side and was chewed up badly on the left - how she'd managed to clear the fence that morning is beyond me. We had only one option and took it without hestitation (couldn't let her suffer any longer).

    I disovered what was left of her nest that afternoon (five broken eggs, two small clumps of feathers). When I returned with one of the havaharts that evening, the eggshells and feathers were gone! Caught nothing that night, but when I checked at about six the following evening there was Mr.Coon in the trap - fresh spoor with white bits of feather in it. A coon on an afternoon schedule.

    So long, Miss Hiss, you fly on through my dreams - you lap turkey, you!

    [​IMG]
    Miss Hiss on the wing summer `05
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2007
  2. birdlover

    birdlover Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 11, 2007
    Northern Va.
    That is just soo sad!! Bless her little turkey heart. I know you will miss her terribly...heck...I miss her and I didn't even know her!! I am assuming and hoping this world is minus one raccoon now? Take care and keep her memory living in your heart. :aww

    Ellen
     
  3. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    She was our favorite. And, yes, I'm a charter member of the Turkey Vulture Preservation Society - and like to keep my buddies fed. We put a lot of effort into predator suppression. What I know now (learned the hard way) is that not only quail work secondary clutches - had read about Wild Easterns building their nests up in dead trees (not such a good strategy), but not this - otherwise I'd have been checking her activities more closely.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2007
  4. SpottedCrow

    SpottedCrow Flock Goddess

    RIP, Miss Hiss...you were something else...[​IMG]
     
  5. chickbea

    chickbea Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 18, 2007
    Vermont
    I'm so sorry - she sounds like she was a sweetie. :aww
     
  6. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    She was a pretty good old turkey bird (actually was wife's lap turkey - I pretty much did chimney retrieval during thunderstorms). She could have easily flown away from the coon - but she was extremely aggressive in protecting her nests.

    [​IMG]

    Ya can never set enough traps, but one can try!
     
  7. CarriBrown

    CarriBrown Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    [​IMG] I'm sorry you lost your sweet girl.
     

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