sci fair

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by call ducks, Mar 31, 2009.

  1. call ducks

    call ducks silver appleyard addict

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    what would be a good one black rosecomb X buff seabright ,
    blue rosecomb X buff seabright ,
    white rosecombs X buff sebright
     
  2. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    Well, what is the purpose of your experiment?

    Are you going for different colors, different body types, tails, combs?
     
  3. call ducks

    call ducks silver appleyard addict

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    will it's more of just a what would the chicks turn out to look like and if there was any big changes . not sure if i should do this if i did it would be a school sci fair. i may be thinking a bout the black X the buff. would be able to see beter.
     
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    ;)Generally for a science fair you are demonstrating something or experimenting to answer questions and showing varying results and predictions.

    I would suggest that you think about (brainstorm) the whole project and come up with several different ideas of what it is that you are demonstrating or experimenting with.

    For example, when I was in 9th grade I experimented with mice and their diet--one was fed a commercial feed and the other was fed somewhat madeup rations. I did this over a period of a couple of months and recorded their differences in size and appearance and behavior as time went on. If I was re-doing this experiment today, I would try to research the specific nutrients needed and see if I could make a better feed, and how that feed compared.

    A few years earlier, I built a homemade incubator and tried to hatch chicks. Either the eggs were infertile, or I did something really wrong and killed them early on. I researched the information on hatching chicks (as a city child, I knew nothing about it, although I got some help from my dad, who helped take care of the chickens for him mama when he was a youngster. I had charts depicting what was supposed to happen, and chick development, etc. It was a fairly good demonstration--except that the eggs never hatched. Someone else had almost an identical project, but her eggs hatched--she placed much better than I did.

    So, to get you started, do you want to experiment or demonstrate?

    What questions would you like to answer (experiment) or what knowledge have you researched and want to demonstrate?

    Do you want to predict something about the cross you're proposing? What?

    Do you want to demonstrate something? What?

    Come up with some ideas (I have several, but it's your project [​IMG] )
     
  5. Teach97

    Teach97 Bantam Addict

    Nov 12, 2008
    Hooker, OK
    Coming from the science teacher standpoint...I would suggest you look into a few things. Depending on how your fair is set up (is it just a local thing or are you trying to get into the national and international fair) there are some pretty tuff rules concerning animals. You might need to enlist the help of a veternarian...just a heads up and warning.

    Another poster had some very good advice and suggestions...specifically cocerning what are the goals of it...if a person was to do an experiment regarding growth on different feeds and such you might actually get the local feed sellers to donate feed for the purpose of seeing whose is the best...just a thought
     
  6. call ducks

    call ducks silver appleyard addict

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    i did some thing simller last year it was white rosecomb X black rosecomb and it was fine. My 4-H leeder gave me a litter just in case they whanted to see it. Relly i just whant to see what the coulring came out to look like.
     
  7. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Then perhaps do a bit of research on the genes likely to be involved with each parent variety, and make some predictions about what you think the offspring "should" be, colourwise/typewise, etc. And compare your predictions with the results.
     

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