Searched about grooves and ridges on eggs

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by bkbuz1987, Jan 30, 2009.

  1. bkbuz1987

    bkbuz1987 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 29, 2008
    Colorado
    I did a search but didn't come up with anything about eggs having grooves/ridges on them. I switched feed because I had an egg break in my hand and the other's were giving thin shelled eggs (even with oyster shell in feed) Now I'm getting thick shells but some have deep grooves/ridges and are just lumpy and bumpy. does it pass or is this what one of my reds going to give me from now on?

    Thanks:D
     
  2. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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  3. bkbuz1987

    bkbuz1987 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 29, 2008
    Colorado
    This is what the site said:

    Immature shell gland ~ Delay onset of sexual maturity 1 to 2 weeks by controlled feeding during rearing.

    Defective shell gland ~ Cull birds which persistently produce such eggs.

    Diseases, e.g. infections bronchitis ~ Follow an effective vaccination programme.

    Stress, e.g. frights and disturbances ~ To avoid frightening birds, minimise human activity in and around the shed. Increase shed security to stop other birds and animals entering the shed.

    Crowding ~ Avoid overstocking.

    Since this is a new thing I'm wondering if this is stress or disease? Hmmmmmm????
     
  4. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    Did you raise them from chicks? Sometimes I think this occurs when you feed layer formula feed a bit too soon. I've had some in the past that I switched over right at 18 weeks, because I thought that is what you were supposed to do. Then I had a batch that I waited to switch them to layer until one in the batch laid; it was something like 22 or 23 weeks. I've had no issues with them. Recently, I found a feed made by Buckeye that actually delays the maturation rate - here is part of the description of that feed: "Complete feed for pullets from 12 weeks until they begin to lay. Designed to control body weight and delay sexual maturity in order to reduce the incidence "blowouts" and premature egg laying."

    I'm going to special order this feed for my current babies when they are close to 12 weeks, and see how these guys grow!

    I think that most often, it's due to their egg-laying gear getting up & running.
     
  5. bkbuz1987

    bkbuz1987 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 29, 2008
    Colorado
    Yes, I've had them since they were a few days old and I did start the layer feed at arounf 18/20 weeks. So you think that may be it?
     
  6. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    It's hard to know for sure, but it could be. Do you feed any vitamins/minerals? Try putting the oyster shell in its own bowl, rather than mixing it in. If you do not feed any vitamins/minerals, consider getting some AviaCharge 2000 (it's available from Strombergs and a few other places online). It's a kelp-based supplement for their water, and it's loaded with all sorts of good things for chickens.
     

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