Seasonal and Foraging Bantam?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Iowa Farm Boy, Jan 17, 2014.

  1. Iowa Farm Boy

    Iowa Farm Boy Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 11, 2014
    I am looking at getting some bantams, but i want them to be good foragers and able to live through long cold winters and hot summers. I was thinking maybe a sumatra? Any suggestions?
     
  2. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    I would be tempted to get bantam Dominiques:

    Historical American breed
    Good camouflage color
    Good foraging skills
    They have rose combs, so perfect for the cold
    For the heat, just give them shade
     
  3. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    What about the nankin? They have a rose comb version, which is what you would need for the cold. They are a super old ancient breed, but they don't sound as if they are very strong foragers.

    Here is a paragraph from the wiki article:

    The breed has two varieties, differentiated by comb type; the single comb Nankin has a large comb with five points, and the rose comb has a medium size one ending in a single spike. All Nankins come in a single color, with buff on the body and black tails. The golden hue is deeper and more lustrous in males, and they have the longer sickle feathers common in roosters. Their beaks are a light horn color, and legs are slate blue.[1]
    Nankins are very friendly in disposition. Though they retain the ability to fly because of their small bodies and relatively large, downward-slanted wings, they tend to be less active and flighty than other bantams overall. They do well in confinement, and tend not to wander much when allowed to free range. Due to their small size and more prominent comb and wattles (especially in the single comb variety), they are not cold hardy chickens, and require insulated shelter in northern regions. The breed matures slowly, and makes a poor meat producer. Their eggs are very small and a creamy white color. Nankin hens are remarkably good mothers, and often go broody.[1]
     
  4. wheezy50

    wheezy50 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 12, 2013
    Morgan Co.
    I have bantam cochins. They have made it through this Indiana winter just fine in an uninsulated/non heated coop. We've had a few nights get as low as -18 so I think their cold tolerance is good.

    They are not as good at foraging for food as my mixed layer flock, but they will scrounge up some bugs, etc. They just don't seem all that interested in "working" for their own food.
     

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