Seasonal layers/slow developers

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by LTygress, Nov 18, 2013.

  1. LTygress

    LTygress Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,252
    250
    193
    Sep 12, 2012
    This past spring, I got chicks from several sources, and obtained many new breeds. I read up on all of them as much as possible, so it was no surprise that the Phoenix and Sumatra roosters just now started to crow at 8 months old. I also don't expect to see any eggs from those breeds before spring. Same goes with my white silkies, since I read they develop slow too.

    But for some of these breeds, I was unable to find out if they were picky seasonal layers or not. All I see are listings of "good layers" or "poor layers" in various descriptions.

    What really stumps me is typically the "broody breeds". Are they poor layers because they STOP laying in cold months, or because they brood so much? Or is it both?

    So if you have owned any of the following breeds, please let me know if they were slow to develop and/or if they are the finicky "seasonal layer" types.

    1.) Large Fowl Buff Polish
    2.) LF Silver-Laced Wyandotte
    3.) LF Blue Cochin
    4.) LF Cuckoo Maran
    5.) Bantam Frizzle
    6.) Bantam Silver Sebright

    I'm pretty familiar with which breeds are likely to go broody (cochins, for instance). But I just don't know which ones are likely to be winter-quitters. None of them are really old enough to be molting heavily right now. I'm just wondering how quickly I need to build the new nests.
     
  2. HEChicken

    HEChicken Overrun With Chickens

    7,544
    174
    316
    Aug 12, 2009
    BuCo, KS
    My Coop
    In my experience the broody breeds lay as well as any other - when they're not broody. I think they got the reputation for being a poor layer only because they spend so much time sitting and raising chicks, rather than actually laying.
     
  3. racinchickins

    racinchickins Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,197
    641
    221
    Apr 23, 2013
    Mooresville IN
    My SLW is a pretty reliable layer. She is about 7-8 months old now. One of my phoenix girls was the first to lay an egg for me! She even beat my Egyptian Fayoumi.
     
  4. LTygress

    LTygress Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,252
    250
    193
    Sep 12, 2012
    I actually don't have the SLW yet, but there are some on the way. I admit I was asking about that particular one in advance.

    I do have Phoenix though, and the roo was the very last one to crow for me, just two days ago.
     
  5. Cats Critters

    Cats Critters Completely Indecisive

    LF Cuckoo Marans in my experience are fairly good layers but they go broody once or twice a year if they are aloud to. I have a CM who is turning 6 this spring that still lays pretty well (every other day) but she takes much longer breaks for winter, molting (what she is currently doing), and she also takes longer to start laying after being broke from being broody. But out of 5 I had 4 where sweet hearts and good mothers (the ones who went broody). But the 1 was mean and a horrible mother.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2013
  6. LTygress

    LTygress Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,252
    250
    193
    Sep 12, 2012
    Okay so CM are one of the seasonal layers then?
     
  7. Cats Critters

    Cats Critters Completely Indecisive

    All of my birds tend to stop laying for awhile (a month or so) in winter usually, I don't proved extra light so the days just get too short, even white leghorns stop. I might have had one or two in the mixed flock keep going through that period as young hens. But CMs as younger hens if they didn't go broody they where pretty good most of the year except that period and molting.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2013
  8. LTygress

    LTygress Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,252
    250
    193
    Sep 12, 2012
    All of mine were pretty consistent the last few years, so they may lay through this year. Although I get the feeling this winter is going to be pretty intense, so we'll see.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by