Second attempt, have questions.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by LegginMF12, Nov 13, 2011.

  1. LegginMF12

    LegginMF12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    O.k. Guys, I completely blew my first incubation attempt. I think it mostly was the bad thermometer making my temps way to low (97). I have new thermometer/hygrometer now and put 2 of the glass thermometers in and have my temp staying at 100.2 to 101.1 and humidity at around 44%. I am using a Hovabator 1602n still air. I live in the high desert (Yucca Valley, Ca) so kinda dry here. I am saving up eggs right now.
    1. How long can they be stored on the counter top with temps ranging between 64F - 72F?
    2. Is it absolutely critical to turn them while they are being stored? I am often gone for more the 18 hrs for work and then only have 4 1/2 hrs to eat, sleep and shower before I have to leave for work again. I also get a a lot of surprise doubles.
    3. What is the lowest the humidity should get without damaging them? I prefer to do a "dry" incubation until lock down when I will then up the humidity.
    4. Will an extra large Rubbermaid tub with a heat lamp be good for a brooder? When I got my first batch of chicks I used a cardboard box in the garage with a heat lamp and they did fine.
    Any answers would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    1. How long can they be stored on the counter top with temps ranging between 64F - 72F?

    Easily one week and probably a little more before hatchability starts to drop. In your dry climate, I'd worry about the humidity some, so start them as soon as you reasonably can.

    2. Is it absolutely critical to turn them while they are being stored? I am often gone for more the 18 hrs for work and then only have 4 1/2 hrs to eat, sleep and shower before I have to leave for work again. I also get a a lot of surprise doubles.

    According to Texas A&M, the first week does not matter that much as far as turning them, but after that, it does. Do you have an automatic turner? If so, plug it in and put the eggs in that. Problem solved. You could even put them in the incubator and fill some water reservoirs to get the humidity up during storage. Just don't plug the heater in.

    3. What is the lowest the humidity should get without damaging them? I prefer to do a "dry" incubation until lock down when I will then up the humidity.

    I'm not going to touch that one. We all have different situations and different thigns work for different ones of us.

    4. Will an extra large Rubbermaid tub with a heat lamp be good for a brooder? When I got my first batch of chicks I used a cardboard box in the garage with a heat lamp and they did fine.

    People use about anything for brooders. If it worked once, it should work again. I put my brooder in the coop with a good draft guard and heat only one area to the required temperature range. The rest I let cool down to ambient, whatever it is that time of year. I'd go bananas trying to keep the entire brooder a constant perfect temperature. Instead, I keep one area warm enough and let them find their own comfort zone. You might be surprised how much time they spend inthe cooler areas.

    If you have time, you might want to read this. It is full of good information.

    Texas A&M Incubation site
    http://gallus.tamu.edu/library/extpublications/b6092.pdf

    Good luck!!!
     
  3. dbcooper02

    dbcooper02 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Eggs can be kept for 7 to 10 days safely, you might still get results at 14 days. A little lower storage temp with some humidity would be better. How's the climate in the cupboard below your kitchen sink?
    I don't turn my eggs before incubation, I set a batch every 7 days.
    Everybody has different ideas of humidity. I haven't put water in my sportsman incubators for months now.
    I do try to hold the hatcher at 60%, but sometimes due to mixups getting the eggs moved to the hatcher I have had eggs, including ducks, hatch in the turners in the dry incubators.
    You want the chicks to be able to find their own comfort zone. I'd fear the heat lamp might be too much for a rubbermaid tub.
     
  4. LegginMF12

    LegginMF12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I wasn't really clear on the use of the tub. I put it on it's side in the garage and aim the heat lamp towards the inside. This way they can pick how close or how far they want to be from it. It does make the garage a mess. But........l. Problem is solved. I just realized that I have this, it's empty, has windows that open and close with screens and it has electricity! Check out my new brooder! [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. rarely bored

    rarely bored Chillin' With My Peeps

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    #3: I've let my incubator get down to 20%, but those eggs lost more weight than is desirable, so I don't recommend going that low. My goal is to keep the humidity (dry incubating) between 25% and 40% for the first 18 days.

    Best wishes on your hatch and that is quite a big brooder box! [​IMG]
     
  6. LegginMF12

    LegginMF12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Big plans take big buildings! [​IMG] Actually The Big Guy has taken over 1/2 of my walk in closet and the spare detached room for all of his hunting stuff. He was out there looking at this to store more stuff in. I calmly walked out there and said "NO". Then I basically peed on my post, marked my territory and went back to the house. Can you say "MINE".
     
  7. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    [​IMG]
     
  8. rarely bored

    rarely bored Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:x2
     

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