self sustaining meatie flock?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by abhaya, Nov 30, 2010.

  1. abhaya

    abhaya Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 5, 2010
    cookeville, tn
    Is it possible to have a successful self sustaining meatie flock?
     
  2. twister

    twister Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 12, 2009
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    i am sure it is possible ( consider DP breeds) and consider what type of meat you are wanting to achieve...

    Limitations in protein levels, length of time to achieve process weight, and excessive ranging will inadvertantly affect the meat quality---my honest opinion.
     
  3. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:That depends on what you mean by "successful." What are you looking to accomplish?
     
  4. thebirdguy

    thebirdguy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 22, 2010
    Idaho Falls
    I've had good luck with Black Australorps.. the hens lay great and the cockerels are a good size for freezer camp.
     
  5. RAREROO

    RAREROO Overrun With Chickens

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    Jul 22, 2009
    Alapaha, Ga
    Breeding Cornish X hens with a Heritage Breed rooster should start a nice self sustaining meat flock. And continue breeding with those offspring and maybe breed Cornish Cross hens back in every 2-3 generations. If you raise the CX hens pretty much the same way as normal chickens they should be healthier and be better fit for breeding especially to a lighter rooster.
     
  6. TimG

    TimG Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 23, 2008
    Maine
    Quote:Do you have experience doing this? Have you seen this done by someone else? Read about the results of such a program somewhere?
     
  7. SteveH

    SteveH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 10, 2009
    West/Central IL
    Quote:Do you have experience doing this? Have you seen this done by someone else? Read about the results of such a program somewhere?

    There are several of us useing CX to do crosses in an attempt to breed lines of self producing meat birds ; you can read about here :
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=316007&p=1

    I'm working on a blue/green egg layer with good meat qualities . My first chick is 9 days old .

    White Ameraucana sire :
    [​IMG]

    a CX dam [ pictured at 10 weeks ] :
    [​IMG]

    9 day old chick :
    [​IMG]
     
  8. TimG

    TimG Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 23, 2008
    Maine
    Quote:Do you have experience doing this? Have you seen this done by someone else? Read about the results of such a program somewhere?

    There are several of us useing CX to do crosses in an attempt to breed lines of self producing meat birds ; you can read about here :
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=316007&p=1

    I'm working on a blue/green egg layer with good meat qualities . My first chick is 9 days old .

    I don't doubt that there are people trying this, but RAREROO spoke as if it had been accomplished by many and that the results were a given.

    Like you with your first chick being 9 days old, I think most are not vary far along, and it is thus premature to speak of a "nice self sustaining meat flock" produced in this manner. I have 5 or 6 Freedom Ranger eggs (which I hope are fertile) and expect to get the incubator out and warmed up later today. But, I am far from declaring success.

    I will say that I can think of two successful programs, one by an Idaho resident and frequent poster here (I'm sorry, I forget the BYC ID) and the now defunct Corn-Del program undertaken in Virginia by someone who has since moved to China.
     
  9. rhoda_bruce

    rhoda_bruce Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2009
    Cut Off, LA
    I know what we have gotten to here and that its supposed to be taboo for some reason, but many of us have played with the idea anyway because we want the best from both worlds.
    Most say it won't work, etc....But like above, I saw another BYCer who tried crossing one of the Cornish Xs and she got 10 chicks out of it and; I'm sorry, but they look like broiler chicks to me.
    I finally said,"Poo....I'm trying it." I can't get a straight answer and with the amount of chickens I have, it won't hurt me to have 3 more, even if I have to limit their feed and give them extra exercise, water and make sure they don't eat themselves to death. I'm still raising the parent stock, so I won't know for @ least 6 months, but with all the people saying it can't happen and the few that have pics of the offspring, contradicting them, I think it is worth a try. I mean the prices of me having to order the chicks @ a hatchery will cancel out any reason to raise them, unless I can totally produce them here.
    I am still considering ordering standard cornishes for the spring however.
    I can see that for some reason I am putting my foot down and slaughtering my unwanted roos and meaties on time, so a dualpurpose is not ideal for me. I need eggs from some and meat from others. Its too discouraging to slaughter a RIR after I just slaughtered a Cornish X. I will do it, however because I will not feed extra chickens, but I need meat.
     
  10. RAREROO

    RAREROO Overrun With Chickens

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    Alapaha, Ga
    Quote:Do you have experience doing this? Have you seen this done by someone else? Read about the results of such a program somewhere?

    I have had the Cornish cross meat type hens that I would raise from chicks just like I would if I was raising regular layer hens, and not meat birds. They still grow to be very heavy but are healthier and dont have the leg problems like the birds that are raised one the full feed type deal. So anyway I have crossed those hens white RIR, BA, and BO roosters and the offspring from them, again raised just like regular chickens, grew very quickly into heavy, meatie birds. That is as far as I went at that point but I am planning to start it back up again if TSC has CX chicks again this spring. And do it the way I described and breed the offspring together for a generation or two, and breed actual CX hens back in every other generation or so when if the size and starts to diminish if it even does. But seeing what I got in that first generation cross, this plan should work great in my opinion. We'll see.
     

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