Selling eggs

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by EasternTNfarm, Jan 3, 2015.

  1. EasternTNfarm

    EasternTNfarm New Egg

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    I have a few questions concerning selling chicken and duck eggs. My family and I have a small farm with plenty of chicken and duck layers. We intend to sell some of the eggs to help pay for feed and such. We have never attempted to sell any eggs yet. We mainly just give them to neighbors. My question (s) are.... What are some important 'labels' we can call our eggs that makes them appealing to the consumer. Our chickens are cage free and 'free ranging' meaning they are fenced in a 2 acre wooded area. They have constant access to water and layer feed (Dumor). We do feed them table scraps. What do consumers want in their eggs? How should we market? Do you have any pointers that can help make us successful? Thank you so much....
     
  2. SunkenRoadFarms

    SunkenRoadFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm assuming you're in TN from your screen name. If so, it looks like you'll need to be licensed - http://www.tn.gov/agriculture/regulatory/permits.shtml

    Also google "Selling eggs in Tennessee" for more info. Your farm extension can also provide a lot of info.

    As for labeling, the law will dictate most of what you'll need. I'm in Maryland and once I include all the required language, I barely have room for our farm info. But I do like to include "pastured" somewhere.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Domanique Fan

    Domanique Fan Out Of The Brooder

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    As SunkenRoadFarms said, your local extension agent will have everything you need. Here in GA you need a Candling Permit (free from the state, after you take the course). Your eggs have to be graded and have an expiration date. Plus of course your farm info.

    To sell your eggs are you going to direct sell on the farm, through a co-op, or farmers market?
    People are looking for well kept chickens, meaning happy chickens doing chickeny things. So pastured or free range is key. Personally I agree with Joel Salatin, total transparency is key. Let people see where the chickens are being kept, the run , the coop, etc. Let them know what you feed them if they ask and let the quality off the product speak for itself.
    We where buying our eggs from one person who had been free ranging their hens but they had some roosting issues and instead of fixing them locked up their chickens. Well needless to say the quality of the eggs suffered and we found someone else who has a larger facility that does free range their eggs. He is also quite upfront when he gets a new set of pullets that have just started laying and haven't gotten a lot of greenery. Winter and all.
    I know way more than you asked for ha ha. But its a lot to think about.
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Start small. Word of mouth is the best way I've found. Work, church, etc are great starter markets. Once you've satisfied those areas, you can decide how to expand. A sign at the road? An ad on Craigslist? A booth at the farmer's market?

    I'd emphasize the free-range part, that's a phrase folks like to hear.
     
  5. SBHERPER

    SBHERPER Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 13, 2015
    This is a few months old but I wanted to chime in. The person posting the response that stated it looks like you need to obtain a license is incorrect for what you stated.

    "Small farm wanting to sell your eggs"

    You do not need a license If you are selling from your own flock. You are not a "egg dealer" as far as the state is concerned.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2015

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