Selling Quail Meat

Discussion in 'Quail' started by 2 E's farm, Mar 28, 2018.

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  1. 2 E's farm

    2 E's farm In the Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2018
    Hello all. I am in Massachusetts and I have found that selling eggs and bids does not take a license. However I have found nothing about selling birds that have been processed. Does anyone know about this?

    Thanks
     
  2. Acre4Me

    Acre4Me Crowing

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    Call your Agriculture extension office. Call your state department of Ag or search the state government website. They may be able to point you in the right direction. BYC has state threads, useful since each state will be a bit different on what is required/allowed.

    Just today I visited my local extension office and asked about selling eggs. They printed off a few sheets to get me started and told me who they thought I might need to talk to at the state level. I'm nowhere near ready to sell eggs (I have 4 week old chicks), and may never sell them, but at least I'll know what is required.
     
  3. lomine

    lomine Crowing

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    I quick google search of "Massachusetts law selling processed meat" brough up a link to a pdf titled Food Protection Program Policies, Procedures and Guidelines. Looks like you can't sell processed meat.

    Here is a quote:
    "Meat and Poultry Intended for Sale as Food:
    All domesticated meat and poultry whose product is intended for sale must be slaughtered and processed in an U. S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA/FSIS) inspected facility. The facility must be subject to mandatory or exempt inspection by USDA/FSIS. All USDA/FSIS inspected facilities are subject to licensure by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH).

    Meat and Poultry Raised for Private Use and Slaughtered and Processed by the Owner:
    Individuals who raise meat and poultry for personal use and slaughter and process the animals may do so without first obtaining a permit from MDPH or the local board of health (LBoH) within whose jurisdiction the slaughtering and processing occurs. The product generated from the slaughtering and processing may not be sold or given away and is solely for use of the owner of the animal, his/her immediate family members and/or non-paying guests."

    CO has similar laws to this but it also has a cottage food law that allows sales to individuals (no restaurants or stores) up to $10,000 per year. You might want to see if MA has a similar law.
     
  4. Acre4Me

    Acre4Me Crowing

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    Meat is generally more highly regulated. Recently I spoke with a friend (who happens to be a lawyer), and friend's father has a farm. Friend was looking into laws around chickens and selling the meat. friend was really surprised and said they had to re-read the guidelines as it was similar to @lomine said in CO - that there was a fairly high level of sale that could occur before regs kicked in (but similar restrictions indicating no sales to restaurants or stores without further inspection etc).
     
  5. lomine

    lomine Crowing

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    I think it's something that has come on the heals of the "eat local" movement and the fact that people are becoming more aware of how some meat animals are treated (especially commercially grown Cornish cross). Lots more people want to buy meat from smaller farmers and ranchers or meat they know was raised and butchered humanely. The new cottage law in CO is fairly recent if I remember my research correctly, or at least the part about selling meat. That's why it's important to continually check the laws for your area.
     

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