Separated pecked hen is totally distraught when not in with the others

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by FrauHuhn, Feb 18, 2014.

  1. FrauHuhn

    FrauHuhn New Egg

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    Oct 19, 2013
    Hi - I know there are a lot of posts about pecked hens, but I haven't seen a response about how to separate a pecked hen. I only have 3 chickens. 1 is being pecked by another hen, with the third occasionally joining in. I subdivided the run and set her up in her own space. She keeps getting back in with her tormentors despite my efforts to make the subdivision secure. She is particularly distraught at roosting time. I felt so bad that I just let her back in with the others.

    Next solution: Since the three hens stopped roosting inside the chicken coop some months ago, I decided to put her in the coop (which has a small run attached that can be isolated from the larger run) for the night. That was ok for the night, but during the day, she was again distraught and trying to get back in with her tormentors. I don't really have a place to keep her that is completely isolated from the others, plus I don't know that is would matter. I'm afraid the pecking will only escalate. I thought about separating the main pecker, but I'm afraid the other one will pick up where she left off.

    Also, I can't get to the feed store for BluKote for another few days due to my work schedule. Any quick home remedies against pecking?

    Thanks in advance,
    Cynthia
     
  2. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens

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    You could try getting her a new friend. You would still have to keep the new one in quarantine, but while she was, the pecked one could be healing up. Or get rid of the two causing the problem and get new ones.
     
  3. ten chicks

    ten chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Separate the bully,she can be placed in a cage inside coop/run where she can see but not touch,see if this makes a difference. Leave her there for a couple of days,then let her out,possibly the time out will give her an attitude change.

    Make sure the hen that is being attacked has no visible wounds on her,otherwise the other birds will keep pecking/picking at her.

    Are your girls all the same breed,or is the one being picked on a fancy breed?
     
  4. FrauHuhn

    FrauHuhn New Egg

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    Oct 19, 2013
    The pecked hen is an ameraucana (mostly I think), as is the bully. The third is a RIR. I'll try separating the bully (I'll get her tonight - the 2 ameraucanas cannot be caught by day).

    They really are little dinosaurs, aren't they?
     
  5. ten chicks

    ten chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They can definitely be little raptors.
     
  6. oegbantamsftw

    oegbantamsftw Out Of The Brooder

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    Pecking order aint pretty I had OEG bantams that would tear each other apart and those were the hens good thing I only had one rooster. As the owner you see them as your little kids and want them to get along as they should but pecking order reigns supreme. Just make sure no blood is drawn.

    Man the day I brought new hens I left them to go to school I got back in the afternoon to find two hens with very swollen combs and wattles one of the many mistakes I have done with my beloved birds but after that little scuffle no more problems.
    The top hen would hog food and water so I just grabbed her when I fed them so they all get to eat equally she was way more of a hassle than the one roo on other farms they would cull her for all the problems she gave but they were my pets I couldn't do that to them my little fluffy chickens California took them away from me screw this dam/n state get my degree and go to a state that likes good chicken owners.

    Breeds what breeds are they some are more aggressive than others and that may be your problem or age.
     

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