Serama chick with 'head-spot' from crele?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Dipsy Doodle Doo, Nov 25, 2008.

  1. Hi!
    I hatched the first chick from the 'next generation' of my Serama a few days ago.
    It is from my light Crele roo mated with his daughters.

    The unusual thing is the chick has a yellow 'head-spot'. None of the other Serama chicks from that LC roo have ever shown a 'head-spot' and I've hatched several that feathered out with light Crele markings.

    Does that mean something? Maybe that one of the 'light brown / tan' daughters is crele also?

    I'll get a pic this evening.

    Thanks,
    [​IMG]
    Lisa
     
  2. Blisschick

    Blisschick not rusty

    Feb 20, 2007
    Shepherd, Texas
    It's possible it could be a sex-link spot indicating that it's male, but you won't know for sure until it's old enough to tell it's sex. As far as I know, that sort of thing isn't usually found in Seramas (yet). If it does turn out to me male, then it was just luck of the genetic draw.
     
  3. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Jan 13, 2008
    Sun City, California
    The head spot on back of head is normal expression on birds with sex linked barring. However, it shows up best on black chicks.. it's pretty common for the head spot to be far less distinct on any other colored chick. On some color downs it just can't be seen most of the time- such as on wheaten(cream downed) chicks.

    It also is suspectible to dose effect, with birds having only one copy of barring to show a weaker head spot than males with two copies. If you bred this roo to a barred hen, it either could be it's a 2 copy male showing a bigger/more distinct head spot, or it just happens to be more distinct on this particular chick..especially if the chick has darker down than most of the others or something like that. Think in contrasts/dilution.
     
  4. Interesting!
    Do either of these little girls (daughters of Light Crele roo) look like they are Crele?
    They just look tan to me, hahaha.

    [​IMG]

    Here is the chick.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I don't see how sex-linked barring would apply here.
    The Crele roo has the barring gene so couldn't he *potentially* pass it to both male and female offspring?
    Got a couple more Ser' chicks hatching the 1st. Can't wait to see how they pop out.

    [​IMG]
    Lisa
     
  5. Blisschick

    Blisschick not rusty

    Feb 20, 2007
    Shepherd, Texas
    Your hens are wheaton. I have one the same color. I don't know how the barring gene would interact with that particular color down, I only know that if your roo has only one copy of the barring gene, there's a 50-50 chance of either sex of the offspring having the barring gene, but 100% if he has two.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2008
  6. Hi! Thanks, what identifies them as 'Wheaten'?

    [​IMG]
    Lisa
     
  7. Blisschick

    Blisschick not rusty

    Feb 20, 2007
    Shepherd, Texas
    The body color of the female is light salmon to wheat colored, with black in the tail and a little on the wings and sometimes the neck. The hackle (neck) feathers will be a darker salmon or wheat color compared to the body. My girl has black on her tail, but only the tinest bit on her wings and none on her neck. Her neck almost looks red compared to the rest of her body.

    bantam game hen
    http://www.cacklehatchery.com/wheaten_oeg_bantam_hen.jpg
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2273811076/in/set-72157603874286064/

    wheaten Marans
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_8iQ6DIM36xg/SJYny7Uv9qI/AAAAAAAAB1w/R9YpHvlLQCo/P1030634.JPG
     
  8. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Jan 13, 2008
    Sun City, California
    Lisa, barring on wheaten hens are very hard to see, as they often are light colored like your hens.. sometimes the only evidence is a single bar on a darker feather on the neck, or the tail has a slightly washed out look(that is the barring being "washed out" over the tail)

    These hens do look like they are probably normal wheatens.

    Wheaten is a different gene. Basically the roosters look pretty much identical to BBR roosters, the main difference are in the hens. BBR hens are highly patterned and "brown".. most wheaten hens look more or less like yours- mostly tan/blond body with black tails.

    It can be hard to describe all wheaten hens, as this gene is very highly affected by many genes which can change the appearance so a wheaten hen can be considerably lighter or darker.. not to worry about this for now though.

    The chick shows the classic white spot on chicks with the sex linked barring. It shows the patch very well mainly because it has darkish down on its back/neck.

    Sex linked barring is merely the 'formal' name for the barring on your roo, barred rocks, cuckoo Marans etc. It inherits in sex linked pattern and there is also another type of barring called autosomal barring so using the term 'sex linked' is just to be clear which barring type is being talked about. (and you were correct that the barring would pass on to both sons and daughters from a barred roo)
     
  9. It's possible it could be a sex-link spot indicating that it's male, but you won't know for sure until it's old enough to tell it's sex.

    Ah! That threw me off.
    I've got to look up the difference in autosomal barring and sex-link barring. Oh shoot, explain the difference when you have time and nimble fingers.

    Look at the funny pattern on the lower wing on the hen on the right. I think it was you that told me when I was asking about making crele without BBR that girls would be hard to ID.
    *shakes head*
    [​IMG]
    Lisa​
     
  10. Blisschick

    Blisschick not rusty

    Feb 20, 2007
    Shepherd, Texas
    Quote:I don't know that it was me, but I don't see anything unusual in her markings. All I see is normal variation within the color pattern.
     

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