Serama chickens are tougher in winter than I thought.

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Soula, Dec 20, 2016.

  1. Soula

    Soula Out Of The Brooder

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    When I hatched 4 little Seramas, I was prepared to give them heating lamp when the temperature below 32F. But last night I forgot to turn on the heat lamp, and it was 16 degree this morning at 7:30am. I opened the mini coop I built for them, they are alive and well. Last week, the night temperature dropped to 3 F degree, even I turned on the 75W heat lamp, I still worry they might freeze to dead. But it was only 5 degree inside the run early in the morning, I opened the chicken run enclosed with greenhouse films, they still willing to come out of the coop to eat and drink, and spent whole day in the run.

    I let them free range in the back yard a couple of hours even when the temperature was 22F. The little Serama roosters still like to stay outdoor even the temperature was around 20~25 and windy! I was surprised, and I guess they are not as delicate as we thought. My Serama roosters are about 14oz, very tiny compare to other bantam hens. The key is let them acclimate to the weather slowly and naturally. Once they get used to the cold weather, they are tougher than we give them credit for.
     
  2. Soula

    Soula Out Of The Brooder

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    Here are some pictures of my Serama roosters
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  3. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    Cute. They should be as hardy as any other bantam breeds as they are well feathered. I'm not sure why people say they aren't.
     
  4. Soula

    Soula Out Of The Brooder

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    Dear Lisa,

    Because their sizes are very tiny, and originally from Hot climate Malaysia. I guess they can adapt the cold weather pretty well.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2016
  5. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    Makes sense. It is good to hear from someone who has experience with keeping them in colder weather as others sometimes ask about them.
     
  6. Soula

    Soula Out Of The Brooder

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    Before I got Serama, I read everything I could get from the internet. Some people said, they cannot tolerate under 40, some said, under 32F. But my Serama roosters with fully grown feathers still active at 22 degree, and not afraid of the 5 degree temperature inside the chicken run.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2016
  7. Soula

    Soula Out Of The Brooder

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    Before I got Serama, I read everything I could get from the internet. Some people said, they cannot tolerate under 40, some said, under 32F. But my Serama roosters with fully grown feathers still active at 22 degree, and not afraid of the 5 degree temperature inside the chicken run.
     
  8. Soula

    Soula Out Of The Brooder

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    Some useful information Quoted from this website:
    http://countrysidenetwork.com/daily...Countryside Daily&utm_campaign=Daily 12.22.16

    SERAMA HARDIER IN COLD CLIMATES THAN WAS ORIGINALLY THOUGHT
    By J.P. Lawrence, Michigan, SCNA Member

    Serama chickens are from a tropical climate, so before importation to the United States, the breed had not been exposed to the colder climates that occur in much of the U.S. Naturally, the thought was that these chickens could not handle the cold climates, but they are a little hardier to the cold than what was originally expected. In the first years, they were said not to do well in temperatures much less than 40°F. They have since been exposed to areas such as Michigan, Canada, and Ohio, and areas known for their cold winters.

    Living right next to Lake Michigan made me wary about getting Serama. I decided to take the chance, figuring that I could find a warm spot to baby them during the winter. To say the least, they are not being babied. My birds are in the utility room of my hen house which is not insulated and is rather drafty. I have three pens at the moment: one with pullets, one with my original pair, and one with cockerels. The latter two have heat lamps on them, and that is all that they have in the way of heat. My pullets do not have any source of heat aside from themselves.
     

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