Serious problem

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ffox12, Sep 30, 2010.

  1. ffox12

    ffox12 New Egg

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    [​IMG] About 3 weeks ago one of our hens (7 year old) got an impacted crop, really impacted. I couldn't get it freed up so I took her to the Vet. That was the first of last week. He did surgery and removed lots of grass, corn, and other Ewwww. Ever since then she has refused to eat, drinks water almost constantly. I have been force feeding her some food supplement I got from the vet, and a little plain yogurt, and she will eat a few mill worms..And I massage her crop to make sure it goes down. But ever since the surgery, about once or twice a day I turn her upside down and a lot of water and cracked corn comes out her mouth. She has not had access to corn since the surgery, has to be some that was still in her system.
    Anyway this morning when I went out to feed her she was leaking bad from her incision. That's the first shes done that. I would have to think the sutures in her crop has come loose.
    I can't afford another $150 at the Vet. and I think she had another problem anyway. Another blockage someplace..

    Is there any humane and painless way I can put her down?

    Thanks a lot, and thank God for Backyard chickens.
     
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    So sorry your bird is ill. There are several methods you could use. The quickest way to euthanize a bird is cervical dislocation through decapitation with an axe or by using the rake method. The rake method is placing a rake on the ground teeth down with the head on one side of the tines and the body on the other side. While holding the rake down, grab the chicken by the feet and give a quick, hard yank to break the neck. It is very easy to break a chicken's neck, but you can't be squeamish about your pull otherwise you will just hurt the bird and not kill it. There may be a little flapping but that is just nervous reaction.

    If you take the bird to a vet they will probably use a heart stick to euthanize the bird. I had this done once to my daughter's guinea pig and I swore I would never do it again. It took much longer than it should have and the animal was greatly distressed. I do not recommend doing this, but it is always an option.

    CO poisoning can also be used. I reserve that method for predators and not pets. It's supposed to be painless and quick, but I believe it is frightening for at least a few minutes and I wouldn't want to do that to a pet.

    So sorry you are going through this. It's tough.
     
  3. ffox12

    ffox12 New Egg

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    Thank you for the quick reply. I know it won't be easy no matter how I go. Going to the vet. is out of the question. There are no chicken vets. around here. It took a week just to find someone to look at her. And he only did it because I told him I would do it myself if he didn't. He's never worked on a chicken before, he's a big animal vet. mostly horses..A horse doctor. lol..But he did the best he could, he had to call 3 other people before he could find one to tell him how to do it..them my GF and I had to help him..

    She's out right now eating bugs. They all free range. I decided I might as well turn her out. She doesn't seem to be in any pain. I think I'll just let her enjoy it as long as she can, then put her out of it from a distance. I'm an expert shot with a rifle. I was hoping there was a better way.

    Thanks for you suggestions, but I don't think I could do it looking at her.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Since she is out there free ranging and instead of putting her down, why not try to super glue where the sutures popped? Then apply plain neosporin to quicken the healing procees and prevent infection. Dont feed her cracked corn after crop surgery. I'd recommend plain yogurt, scrambled egg mixed with layer crumbles for easier digestion etc...Give her time to heal. Then if all else fails....use a .22 to the back of the head....it's quick and painless, no suffering. Good luck.
     
  5. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm no vet, but I have been thinking that often these sour/impacted crop problems are often more symptoms of other underlying problems than they are problems in and of them selves. What are others thoughts on this?

    If there are any other blockages in the system, food will sit in the crop and rot or if the bird othwise is weakened by something it is easy for yeast or fungal infections to set in.

    There are simply hundreds of possibilities that could underly a failing crop many we simply can't fix. Yes it is possible that they just ate some junk that they can't move into the digestive system, yes it is possible that if the crop can be delt with and what ever else was causing trouble either passes or can be treated the bird can recover.

    I don't imagine glueing the exterior skin will help, the leak is internal and would need to be sealed at the crop otherwise the liquid would just pool in the body cavity or under the skin and cause more problems. Suppose an attempt could be made to go back in and seal the crop better, but don't know if that will cure in the end.

    As for putting the bird down, the things that are most graphic to us are likel best for the bird, the easy ways out for us by gassing are not as quick and clean for the bird.
     
  6. ffox12

    ffox12 New Egg

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    Sep 30, 2010
    I really do appreciate all the help. And I agree with you all...Thanks Dawg. I have been trying to feed her plain yogurt, scrambled egg, milk, and even bought her 4 dozen red worms..She won't eat anything. She ate one of the worms and just pecked 4 others to death..I've been force feeding her a food supplement (liquid) from the vet..but it's really hard to force feed her the more solid food. I use a syringe with a small piece (2 inches) of hose on it to feed her the supplement, but the other stuff won't go through it..I also put Duramycin-10 in her drinking water. At least she drinks a lot of water..And about the 22, that's the way I'm thinking too.

    Clay Valley. I'm in total agreement with you. This is the second hen that's had this, we lost the other one..I know for a fact that the crop was empty after the surgery but the next day it was really swollen, I turned her upside down and pushed on it and about 1/4 cup of corn and some grass clippings came out. Since then I've gotten small amounts of corn and some grass out of her, but she's been in a cage and had no way of getting either corn or grass. It had to have been someplace farther down. I'm thinking another blockage caused the whole thing...And you're right about the glue. I could glue the outside but I would have to cut her open to glue the crop, and without something to deaden it I would probably kill her anyway, and very painfully...I guess I'll just let her live til she shows signs of being in pain then end it.
     
  7. Ed62

    Ed62 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sorry to hear about the problem, But....
    Quote:I would handle it in the same way. You have your priorities in order.

    Ed
     
  8. ffox12

    ffox12 New Egg

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    I just want to thank all the wonderful people who gave me the information and best wishes for my girl...She just kept getting worse. Couldn't keep her from pecking at the incision, she finally got an infection and started leaking fluid from her crop.

    Yesterday I decided that she didn't have a chance of making it any longer. I put a 22 cal. hollow point bullet in the back of her head. She flopped a couple of times and was gone. Probably one of the hardest things I've ever done..

    Thanks again, and good luck to you all always.
     
  9. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    It's really a tough thing to do, you did your best, and now she's not suffering. I wish you the best.
     

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