Seriously weird yellow hard broody poo. Pale comb and scratching at face.

Leihamarie

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Jul 28, 2016
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Hey all! So, I have a broody that's been sitting on wooden eggs for about a week and a half. I intend to slip some chicks under her at the end of next week. She will not move unless I force her off the nest to eat/drink/bathe/poop (I'm sure of this). A few days ago I kicked her off and she went straight for forage, pooped out this (the yellow, upon inspection was hard & crystallized) and then bathed voraciously, her previously dry nares getting drippy halfway through.

Shortly after she expelled a small amount of additional bubbly yellow stuff that was too minimal to get a picture of. The yellow in the poop happened again yesterday but a very small amount. Today, she has a pale comb, is drinking plenty of water but not eating enough (she screeches a little every time she goes in for a bite of food) and still starts out her bath with dry nares, but they start running halfway through. It has been REALLY hot here in the last couple weeks (the other hens have slightly pale "heat" combs, are living on frozen watermelon & shade to stay cool and have heat poop) but the temp in the coop stays mild compared to the outside.

What in the world is going on with this young hen?!? I'm starting Acidified Copper in case it's fungal or protazoal and I have doxycycline on hand just in case, I also have safeguard liquid that I can follow the acidified copper with. Her crop is empty and she has no weird smells, and her butt is clean. (no vent gleet)
Age: 11 months
Last egg laid: 1.5 weeks ago (just after going broody)
Last Wormed: November 2016
Weight: 4lb 1oz.
Symptoms began: Wed (4 days ago)
 

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Wyorp Rock

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How is she doing?

@Eggcessive ?

The poop looks like egg to me. Possibly she is still passing some partial egg yolks(?) that were still in the "works" when she went broody.

Since you will be giving her some chicks - you may want to go ahead and start transitioning her to chick starter or an all flock type feed that has less calcium. I assume you have oyster shell free choice for your other girls - so she can pick up some of that if it's needed.

I would also give her some poultry vitamins to help give her a boost. Since it's warm/hot try to keep her hydrated the best you can.

The runny nares could be from the dust bathing - but keep watch to see if she has a runny nose at any other time.

Let us know how she is doing.
 

Leihamarie

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Jul 28, 2016
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Thanks @Wyorp Rock!

I'm going to move her to a "Maternity Ward" tonight in the run, but sectioned off so I can monitor her food & water intake more closely and to give her some privacy/security from the other girls who want to get in and lay in the nest box she's claimed (she is NOT in the mood to share). I think leaving her nest "vulnerable" to the other hens might be at least partially the reason she's not moving off of it to eat/drink/etc...
 

chickens really

Crazy Mother of Goat Kids
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That sounds like a good plan....I feed my setting hens Chick starter..I will add some peas and scrambled egg every few days to keep her going...For the most part they do not eat very often...
 

Eggcessive

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I agree with WyorpRock in that the first picture looks like egg yolk material. That can be common in internal laying or egg yolk peritonitis. Here is some reading for you:
http://scoopfromthecoop.nutrenaworld.com/tag/laying-issues/
http://www.theveterinaryexpert.com/backyard-poultry/egg-yolk-peritonitis/
  • From TheMerck Veterinary Manual
Egg peritonitis is characterized by fibrin or albumen-like material with a cooked appearance among the abdominal viscera. It is a common cause of sporadic death in layers or breeder hens, but in some flocks may become the major cause of death before or after reaching peak production and give the appearance of a contagious disease. It is diagnosed at necropsy. Peritonitis follows reverse movement of albumen and Escherichia coli bacteria from the oviduct into the abdomen. If the incidence is high, culture should be done to differentiate between Pasteurella (fowl cholera) or Salmonella infection. Antibiotic treatment of peritonitis caused by E coli infections is usually ineffective. Management of body weight and uniformity, reproductive development (ovary follicle growth and maturation), and drinking water sanitation are the best preventive strategies.
 

Leihamarie

Songster
Jul 28, 2016
321
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San Diego
I agree with WyorpRock in that the first picture looks like egg yolk material. That can be common in internal laying or egg yolk peritonitis. Here is some reading for you:
http://scoopfromthecoop.nutrenaworld.com/tag/laying-issues/
http://www.theveterinaryexpert.com/backyard-poultry/egg-yolk-peritonitis/
  • From TheMerck Veterinary Manual
Egg peritonitis is characterized by fibrin or albumen-like material with a cooked appearance among the abdominal viscera. It is a common cause of sporadic death in layers or breeder hens, but in some flocks may become the major cause of death before or after reaching peak production and give the appearance of a contagious disease. It is diagnosed at necropsy. Peritonitis follows reverse movement of albumen and Escherichia coli bacteria from the oviduct into the abdomen. If the incidence is high, culture should be done to differentiate between Pasteurella (fowl cholera) or Salmonella infection. Antibiotic treatment of peritonitis caused by E coli infections is usually ineffective. Management of body weight and uniformity, reproductive development (ovary follicle growth and maturation), and drinking water sanitation are the best preventive strategies.
I was afraid it was yolk. This is my first time allowing a broody to stay broody and raise chicks. Before going broody, she was an excellent layer of thick shelled mint green eggs. Does the expelled yolk definitely mean there's a problem? Is it abnormal to expel yolk 1 week into being broody and not laying?
 

ZachyWachy

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My Coop
I have a different problem with a momma hen(hope you don't mind me asking something else and not answering you Leihamarie). Today, I picked her up to move her, and noticed that her feet were larger than the feet of other chickens proportionally. Otherwise she seems to be ok, I am just curious about why her feet might be swollen. She has one chick, is a buff orpington, has access to chick feed and water, she is in a confined area with another hen with two chicks, there are few plants and they are small, the bedding is old hay on the ground. I hope that this is nothing bad, but would still like to make sure. Any ideas?
 

Eggcessive

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I was afraid it was yolk. This is my first time allowing a broody to stay broody and raise chicks. Before going broody, she was an excellent layer of thick shelled mint green eggs. Does the expelled yolk definitely mean there's a problem? Is it abnormal to expel yolk 1 week into being broody and not laying?
Yes, that is abnormal. But there is really not much you can do about her possible condition. I would remove her from her nest twice a day, so that she will go out and eat, drink, poop, and maybe take a quick dust bath. I sometimes place a tuna can with feed or chopped egg in from of mine, just so they will take some food. I do that with water as well. Sometimes they are in such a trance, they won't eat, but when they see the scrambled egg, that gets their attention.
 

Wyorp Rock

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I have a different problem with a momma hen(hope you don't mind me asking something else and not answering you Leihamarie). Today, I picked her up to move her, and noticed that her feet were larger than the feet of other chickens proportionally. Otherwise she seems to be ok, I am just curious about why her feet might be swollen. She has one chick, is a buff orpington, has access to chick feed and water, she is in a confined area with another hen with two chicks, there are few plants and they are small, the bedding is old hay on the ground. I hope that this is nothing bad, but would still like to make sure. Any ideas?
Hi @ZachyWachy

Sometimes it's easier to make your own thread about a problem - less confusing during conversation unless everyone makes sure to quote who they are addressing.
Anyway...Photos of the foot are usually helpful. Do you see any scabs or bruises on top or on the bottom of the feet?

Swelling of the feet can be several things - Bumblefoot (infection of the foot) and Gout are 2 that readily come to mind.

**********

@Leihamarie

I agree with @Eggcessive She has given you some good advice.
 

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