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SEVERELY Frostbitten Toes - Update **Graphic Pictures**

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by hen-thusiast, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. hen-thusiast

    hen-thusiast Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 8, 2009
    Utah
    **Pictures and updated added today. Post #23. Pictures are graphic.**

    I was hoping somebody could help me out with a severe frostbite problem. First of all I just wanted to say, advice only. Please no judgements.

    The birds in question were rescued today. I did not cause this problem and do not want to see them suffer, but want to give them a chance. They are currently in quarantine, in a safe, warm and dry environment. We have separate clothes and shoes for use around them. They appear to be healthy other than the obvious. If they turn out to not be healthy and/or are suffering too much, we'll do what needs to be done.

    They are 4-5 month old BLRW, all three are pullets. Two have severely frostbitten toes. The worst of them has dead flesh probably half-way back and some of her nails are falling out or already have. The other one, it looks fresher, I'm not sure what the extent of the damage will be. Both of them are having difficulty walking, as would be expected.

    Doesn't appear to be any other issues (other than a bad case of lice that is being treated). Brought them home late in the day and they haven't ate or drank yet. Giving them Avia Charge 2000 and will give them probiotics and healthy energy food tomorrow. Lady said she fed them layer feed... but it looked an awful lot like scratch to me. So far poops look fairly normal, maybe a small drop of blood in one. Could be from the heavy lice problem. Will also worm them when they are a bit stronger.

    I was wondering what advice people had on this kind of treatment. We bathed their feet gently in lukewarm slightly soapy water and then gently rubbed them with Betadine. Has anybody been through this before? Would wrapping the affected area help or would it just make it worse? What is the best way to keep their feet from being infected? I'm assuming the dead tissue will not grow back and they will just learn to adapt if they make it.

    If anybody wants to see pictures, I can try posting some tomorrow, but they are tuckered out and sleeping now. The frostbite is pretty bad and the pictures would be graphic, not for the faint of heart.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2010
  2. lovetocook

    lovetocook Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 12, 2009
    Washington, NJ
    I have no experience with this but perhaps this bump will help alert someone who does.[​IMG]
     
  3. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Do not reexpose to cold temps... make sure the surface where they may stand is amply covered in shavings to aid in lessening the pain of standing... have their feed and drink close by so they dont have to walk to it.
    If you know an avian vet you could enquire about (suitable for avian patient) anti-coagulation meds (used in mamalian/human frostbite treatment).
     
  4. OhMyItsAndyy

    OhMyItsAndyy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 22, 2009
    West England
    As long as they aren't pecking at each others, or their own feet, i would leave it open.
    Simple cleaning ointments such as tea tree oils will help to clean it. Just keep them warm and don't make them work to much for their food and water.
    Right now they need some TLC.
    you're doing a good job from what i can read

    And yes, they will adapt, even if they lose their feet. A few chickens have lost their feet and continued as normal.

    If you need to wrap their feet, dont do it tightly. Just, an old clena t-shirt, just so they can't get to their feet... like flares [​IMG]
     
  5. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Tempe, Arizona
    Do NOT use tea tree oil! It is extremely toxic to birds! Wash with saline or diluted iodine/betadine. Neosporin or similar antibiotic ointment (without added pain medicine) is fine.
     
  6. aveca

    aveca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 30, 2009
    Waverly, NY
    anyone living in the reigons with well below freezing wind chills is suffering through this right now.. Despite I have a red light heat lamp in rooster house, he still went outside and got frostbitten comb slash wattles . Our bigger hen house is heated to around 45 - 50 degrees so no problems in there , but the rooster needed to keep his eyes on the hood and went out and even with vaseline he still got frost bitten, vet said depending on how bad it is, he may have to loose his comb. He is now blocked in and it isnt as bad as it could have been but everyone I talk to has it to different degrees, plus the hospitals are seeing lots of people with frostbitten didgets and ears. (I work at hospital) Once you have frostbite, you will always be sensitive to it .Now that rooster is blocked inside vet wants to see how it develops befor she decides next step.

    Might be a thought to keep breeds with lower combs in this region. During the 1500s there was a mini Ice age, even horses lost their ears in northern europe during that period, there is a famous painting of a warmblood stallion a renouned valuable horse, but he lost both ears to frostbite and the artist pained him just that way. Farmers I beleive began the practice of dubbing birds , not for fashion but to ward off frostbite.
     
  7. hen-thusiast

    hen-thusiast Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 8, 2009
    Utah
    Thank you for your responses everyone! We have the three of them in a big dog crate, so it's only a step or two away to food and water. That's a good idea about the shavings Diana. The one with the fresher frostbite is in a bit more discomfort and I think she'd like that. We've got three good avian vets in the area, I'll try calling one today.

    The feet aren't being pecked at. Sounds like I'll stick with betadine, maybe make a lukewarm saline solution next time I clean them as well.

    Thanks again everyone!
     
  8. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    You can add aspirin to their drinking water to lessen pain--I think it is 5 regular strength aspirins per gallon of water--check Diana's website--I am pretty sure it lists the correct dose.
     
  9. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Quote:Ditto. Treat as you would human frostbite... do not rub.
    I would say use aloe vera but avoid any oil or fat (ale vera mixed with glycerine is very cooling). mist with room temp water.
    Use ASPIRIN and not an aspirin substitue like NSAID etc. One childrens strength aspirin to a half gallon of water in this case (dribble some along the beak once every hour if you can).
    If they are not wanting to drink then put ellectrolytes in their water and use the aspirin water to dribble along in their beak regular. (do not mix the aspirin in with electrolytes)
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2010
  10. ultasol

    ultasol Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 30, 2009
    SE Washington
    To prevent infection may I highly second the use of betadine. It has worked wonders for me in the past on both foul and furry creatures in disinfecting wounds, soaks, etc.
     

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