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Sex and possible breed

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by SweetDaisy, Oct 6, 2013.

  1. SweetDaisy

    SweetDaisy New Egg

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    Oct 6, 2013
    South Shields. UK
    The chicks I'm posting are 6 weeks old today when photos were taken. Could you help try and breed and sex them please. The brown one has had a comb since about 2weeks. The black one still has no comb but becoming red. :)

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    So cockerels or hens:rolleyes:
     
  2. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Oct 16, 2010
    NEK, VT
    6 or 16 weeks old? They look rather large and extremely well feathered for 6 weeks.

    Looks to be a silver laced Wyandotte pullet and possibly a Welsummer. The Wellie if 16 weeks old looks like a pullet, if less than 10 weeks is a cockerel but looks like a point of lay bird.
     
  3. SweetDaisy

    SweetDaisy New Egg

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    Oct 6, 2013
    South Shields. UK
    Sorry, they are both 7 weeks today and they feathered really quickly. The Wellie started to Feather within 2 days and it's comb was prominent really early which made me suspect a roo. He also appears to be a climber and more adventerous to be where he's not meant to be. My husband has thought he heard one of them trying to cock a doodle doo last week. I let them out every morning and they're still cheeping first thing.

    could I ask another different question?

    How do you suggest we put all the chickens back together? We fenced off the mother and babies when:cd she was sitting in the eggs and want to get them all back together if possible. And when do you suggest we do it :cd
     
  4. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 8, 2013
    Australia
    Both cockerels I reckon. The Wellie for sure. It's already outgrowing the 'partridge' pattern feathers, which a pullet would keep, into plain solid color male ones. He'll be the one practicing the crow, I'd bet.

    Quote: I suggest putting them back while they're young enough to be swiftly put into a lower social status by the dominant birds, without being allowed to become overgrown, cocky young males who might challenge the dominant birds because they think they're invincible due to lack of experience otherwise. So, reintroduce them ASAP, I reckon, but supervise. They may attack babies or may be bullied. While they're so young they're likelier to cede ground to dominant adult birds, and also receive leeway based on their immaturity; it's a better chance of peaceful integration.

    A few scuffles will probably happen, but as long as they don't descend into serious bloody fights, it should all smooth over. Young males raised external to a flock can lose the instincts to deal with hens and babies, and be violent troublemakers as adults, having never learnt those social skills. Also, when inexperienced, they can overestimate their own abilities and tackle birds which can kill them. So the younger, the better the time to mingle them, in my opinion.

    If that young Wellie is starting to think grown up thoughts, he'll try to mount the hen, and she may be extremely displeased by such an affront from a subordinate animal. If you have a rooster, he may take offense just because she does.

    As for how to reintroduce them, it depends on your setup and their mentalities. Generally I would make sure they've all been within sight of each other for a week. Then, depending on the expectations of trouble based on the behavior I've seen them exhibit when they're observing each other from either side of the mesh, I would either just let them all free range together while I supervise, or if I was expecting trouble I'd throw some distractions in there, so they are less likely to focus on each other exclusively... But then again, for some cases, I allow them no distractions, to focus on each other so as to give them a good chance to sort it out as quickly as possible.

    Sometimes I make sure they encounter the dominant birds under biased circumstances so their social status is settled as quickly as possible. It really depends on what you know of their individual proclivities. I can't really suggest any guaranteed method, but letting them watch each other for a week first is often helpful. But they are only young still so that may be overkill. Introducing them while scattering treats all around helps with some.

    Best wishes.
     

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