sex influence by heat

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by choopes, Nov 23, 2010.

  1. choopes

    choopes Out Of The Brooder

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    my farm South Alabama
    Is it true that incubator heat effects the sex? If my last hatching was slightly warmer then normal, could I expect more roosters or hens? Or is this a myth?
     
  2. rebelcowboysnb

    rebelcowboysnb Confederate Money Farm

    No. Not in birds.
     
  3. Arrowhead07

    Arrowhead07 Out Of The Brooder

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    I would like to know this also! Every hatch I do is heavy males. If I get 10 chicks 7 or 8 are males every time
     
  4. AinaWGSD

    AinaWGSD Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes and no. In birds, the gender is determined only by the parents, not the incubation temperature. However, it has been found that male embryos have a higher in shell mortality rate than female embryos at higher temps. (I think that's right, or maybe I'm remembering it backwards...I thought it was really interesting when I read that article, but I don't currently have any plans to incubate eggs so it's one of those tidbits of knowledge that my brain doesn't want to hold on to too tightly.) So while the incubation temperature will not affect the number of male vs female chicks, it could affect how many males vs females hatch. You can skew the overall ratio of male to female, but you will also be getting a lower hatch rate because more chicks would not make it to hatch.
     
  5. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:x2 [​IMG]

    I hatched several batches totaling over a hundred chicks this spring, and found this to be true. I hatched BO x BR eggs, which makes sex-link chicks, so sex was apparent at hatch. Warmer temps=more females, cooler temps=more males. At the warmer temps I got 80% females, and a lot of unhatched eggs (I didn't have the guts to check them to see if they were males [​IMG] ).

    Remember though, that the gender of the chick is decided before the egg is even layed. All you can do is influence which hatch and which don't. By raising the temp, you'll get a higher percentage of pullet chicks, but you won't be getting a 90% hatch rate among all the eggs.
     
  6. Toast n Jelly

    Toast n Jelly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I believe you're thinking of reptiles. [​IMG]
     
  7. speedy2020

    speedy2020 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:x2 [​IMG]

    I hatched several batches totaling over a hundred chicks this spring, and found this to be true. I hatched BO x BR eggs, which makes sex-link chicks, so sex was apparent at hatch. Warmer temps=more females, cooler temps=more males. At the warmer temps I got 80% females, and a lot of unhatched eggs (I didn't have the guts to check them to see if they were males [​IMG] ).

    Remember though, that the gender of the chick is decided before the egg is even layed. All you can do is influence which hatch and which don't. By raising the temp, you'll get a higher percentage of pullet chicks, but you won't be getting a 90% hatch rate among all the eggs.

    What is the temperature consider high and low?
     
  8. eenie114

    eenie114 Completly Hopeless

    This is true for alligators.... [​IMG] Or was it crocodiles? [​IMG]
     
  9. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    It's true for some reptiles and insects. . . Not for chickens.
     
  10. dwegg

    dwegg Chillin' With My Peeps

    good questions...but I too want to know what is considered to be 'high temp' and a 'low temp' during hatch... [​IMG]
     

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