Sexing an adult parakeet

Discussion in 'Caged Birds - Finches, Canaries, Cockatiels, Parro' started by ms.cluckling, Dec 22, 2010.

  1. ms.cluckling

    ms.cluckling Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I read that you can tell the gender of a parakeet based on the color of the feet and the skin above its beak. So, one of my birds, Nick, has a blue color. Precious, my other bird, always had a pink skin color. But after a year or two of having her, her skin turned brownish-purple. so, what is she??
     
  2. cassie

    cassie Overrun With Chickens

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    I used to work in a pet shop years ago. If memory serves, the cere, that skin above the beak, is blue in males and brown in females.
     
  3. ms.cluckling

    ms.cluckling Chillin' With My Peeps

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    hmmm, so that means precious is a girl...
    but, Ive kept the male and the female in the same cage for 7 years now, and she's never laid a single egg...
     
  4. emvickrey

    emvickrey ChowDown Silkie Farm

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    I raised parakeets and the nose area is blue in boys and pinkish to brown in girls. I also had some that didn't lay eggs. It happens with every creature. Some just don't reproduce.
     
  5. Akane

    Akane Overrun With Chickens

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    Certain colors do not follow that rule. I found it's more fool proof to look for a white ring around the nares (nostril). Hens will have them from a very young age while males will not although they might have a lighter blue ring so sometimes it's hard to tell in pictures whether it's actually white. Especially with flash. If the cere turns brown sometimes then you definitely have a hen. There's a great gender guide here for young budgies http://talkbudgies.com/showthread.php?t=50487 . I think it also mentions what their adult colors will be along with lots of people posting pics and asking gender of various ages throughout the thread.
     
  6. ms.cluckling

    ms.cluckling Chillin' With My Peeps

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    interesting. thanks!
     
  7. sgtmom52

    sgtmom52 Birds & Bees

    ms.cluckling :

    hmmm, so that means precious is a girl...
    but, Ive kept the male and the female in the same cage for 7 years now, and she's never laid a single egg...

    I have found that if you supply them with a proper nest box they will sometimes begin to lay eggs. I wouldn't suggest trying this unless you are prepared to deal with finding homes for any babies they may raise.​
     
  8. emvickrey

    emvickrey ChowDown Silkie Farm

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    I sold mine to pet shops.
     
  9. duckncover

    duckncover Duck Obsessed

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    If there is no nestbox they won't feel obligated to lay eggs. They sell good ones at petshops. I've had birds that will lay regardless but for the most part they only lay if they have a dark box to lay in.
     
  10. BeccaB00

    BeccaB00 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You cannot entirely depened on the color of the cere to tell

    you the sex of your birds. It's an easy way to tell most of the

    time but I've seen some males have pink ceres, and I've

    seen some females have blue ceres. Now, firstly, what mutation

    do you have? Albinos normally have very light pink ceres whether

    it's male OR female, and lutinos NORMALLY have white ceres.


    Males should have - Blue, dark blue, purple ceres

    Females- pink, white, tan, brown, or light light LIGHT blue.

    Cere is the colored erea around their nostrills, right above their beaks.

    Looking at the color of their feet has not worked for me, and I wouldn't

    think it's a good way to tell. Good luck with your birds [​IMG]
     

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