Sexing barred rock(Plymouth Rock) chicks

Mcombs

In the Brooder
Apr 30, 2020
29
10
36
I went to a store around where I lived and got some chicks to keep mine company.(had to get 6) I’ve been researching how to sex them, but I can’t tell. I’m only including 5 pics, because one I’m positive is a pullet. There’s 2 or 3 of the others I believe are cockerel. One I believe is 100% cockerel, he has all the things they say to look for. Yellow feet, a lot of white on wings, white spot that’s not that defined and goes into his neck. And I can just tell by his personality. The others I’m not sure some has black wings and yellow feet. Some have a prominent spot on there head but white on wings, etc. but all 5 kinda look or act like cockerels. Doesn’t make sense to me, the guy picked them randomly and there was at least 20 chicks there. Seems kinda weird I’d get all cockerels
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Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
27,274
20,091
907
Southeast Louisiana
Forget all that other stuff, just look at the spot on their heads. The barring gene is a sex linked gene. That means BR boys have two copies of that gene, the girls only have one. The spot on the boy's head will be larger, on the girls it will be smaller.

I don't have the experience to be good at it but I think you got two pullets.
 

Mcombs

In the Brooder
Apr 30, 2020
29
10
36
Also if anyone knows how to determine the sex on my other chick. I thought for sure it was a pullet, the way it acted but it just attacked me, so not so sure now. It’s a buff x australorp. (Tried to spread its wing, but I only had one hand) also #6 was the one I didn’t post earlier, pretty sure it’s a pullet. Very light spot on head, female characteristics, dark feet.
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Mcombs

In the Brooder
Apr 30, 2020
29
10
36
Forget all that other stuff, just look at the spot on their heads. The barring gene is a sex linked gene. That means BR boys have two copies of that gene, the girls only have one. The spot on the boy's head will be larger, on the girls it will be smaller.

I don't have the experience to be good at it but I think you got two pullets.
I was really hoping to have just one cockerel, can’t be that lucky though. I can only keep one cockerel. We only have 3 hens right now and a rooster. So no need for anymore
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
27,274
20,091
907
Southeast Louisiana
I've butchered a lot of hens and pullets and use the legs when I make broth. Every hen and pullet has spur buds. Some develop short spurs. Some hens (not many) get spurs so long they curl around and puncture the hen's leg or make it hard for her to walk. This does not happen often at all, a hen growing large spurs is extremely rare, but spurs and spur buds are not a sure sign it is a cockerel.

Cockerels mature at different rates. Some start growing spurs a lot earlier than others. It's really hard to say what's a typical age because it can vary a lot from one cockerel to another. I've butchered a lot of cockerels at six months age. Most of them do have some swelling of the spur buds but I'd hesitate to call that "spurs" yet. They have a lot further to grow.
 

MANNA-PRO

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