sexing chicks

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by deborah the silkie, Dec 29, 2008.

  1. deborah the silkie

    deborah the silkie Out Of The Brooder

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    So i know the best way to tell the sex of chicks is to have all of you experts see photos of them. My only problem is that i dont have a digital camera so the photo thing is a no go at this point. So what I have is fourteen 3 week old chicks, 11 banty cochins, and 3 cochin/silkies. I am wondering what signs i might be looking for in order to sex my chicks? or are they still too young? Any help would be great as I am still quite a neewbie to all of this chicken raising.
     
  2. Hobbley_Farm

    Hobbley_Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I hope someone answers. I sure would like to know also [​IMG]
     
  3. gumpsgirl

    gumpsgirl Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    The cockerels will start getting their red wattles and combs quicker than the pullets will. You should start seeing an obvious change in them around 4 or 5 weeks. The cockerels will also have thicker legs than the pullets. Just watch for the red in the comb area. The pullets won't start getting that red until they are closer to laying around 18 wks. [​IMG]
     
  4. Crazy_For_Chickens

    Crazy_For_Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 18, 2008
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    One thing that you should be looking for are tiny little combs. The ones with the little combs are more likly males than females and then you can pretty much get an estimate of how many boys you have, but after you see a couple combs appering it is best to wait another week, so the other slow poke males can grow them too.

    I hope that I was a help.


    CFC
     
  5. deborah the silkie

    deborah the silkie Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks a bunch gumpsgirl, and crazy for chickens all of that info is really helpful, I think I now have a pretty good idea of which are cockerels and which are pullets.
     

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