Sexing Ducklings and Sexing Chickens: What's the Difference?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by DuckieLover8, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. DuckieLover8

    DuckieLover8 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 26, 2015
    Hello, I am getting ready to get my spring batch of ducklings. I was afraid of getting them from an online source because I didn't want to have one that didn't make it. Of course, I only wanted females so I could have fresh eggs without the extra mouths to feed (no matter how cute they were [​IMG]). I was trying to find a vet or someone in my area that can vent sex the ducklings for me, and I found someone that knows how to sex baby chickens. I was not sure what the difference would be between the two processes. I know that ducks and chickens are anatomically different, but I wasn't sure HOW different they were. Can anyone help me out? Thanks!
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    Chickens are much harder to vent sex than ducklings. To put it bluntly, male ducks have penises and they are fairly easy to see when vent sexing. Male chicks do not and their visible anatomy is very similar to females, so it's easy to make mistakes. Make sure this person you know who says they can sex chicks actually knows what they're doing, because you can seriously injure a chick trying to vent sex it. And even the pros who sex thousands and thousands of chicks can only do it with 90% accuracy, so don't expect good accuracy from a hobbyist that says they can do it.

    Please note that vent sexing both species can only be done in the few days after they are born. After that, the vent loses elasticity and trying to vent sex them is very likely to cause injury.
     
  3. DuckieLover8

    DuckieLover8 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 26, 2015
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2017
  4. DuckieLover8

    DuckieLover8 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 26, 2015
    Thank You! I'll try to find something that will work that's not as risky as vent sexing, unless I can find some new hatchlings. I know that the Welsh Harlequin duck can be sexed by the beak color, as long as they were just hatched or a day old. I previously had these ducks, and they were both confirmed to be females after using this method. They both started laying. The chances with this method tended to be lower, but I guess I might have gotten lucky.
     

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