Sexing Geese

Discussion in 'Geese' started by MamacatPatch, Aug 13, 2010.

  1. MamacatPatch

    MamacatPatch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We have six 'weeder' geese and from what I've read online it's not that easy to determine if they are males or females. They are in a very large 'enclosure/woods' area with ducks, roosters and 3 Boers goats. They are about four months old and have shown no signs of 'acting' male or female yet. I read that ganders have blue eyes and geese have brown? Also read the boys hiss and the girls don't? Don't know if this is true and if it IS true, is it always true? The three mostly gray ones look almost IDENTICAL!

    Here are pix of each of them. I am hoping there are some 'geese experts' out there who can help us know if they are geese or ganders and how many of each! Thanks for all help!

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    Goose One

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    Goose Two

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    Goose Three

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    Goose Four

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    Goose Five

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    Goose Six
     
  2. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    The males tend to be larger. They also tend to stand more "proud". During breeding season they are the ones usually chasing people away. The only sure fire way is to vent sex or wait until next year when the females start laying
     
  3. MamacatPatch

    MamacatPatch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They won't start laying until next year???? My ducks start laying at about five months!

    I was hoping not to catch and wrestle my geese to vent them ... and I probably won't! LOL

    Thanks anyhow!
     
  4. Kim65

    Kim65 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Geese only lay in the spring, from February to May. The rest of the year, sexing them can be a challenge.

    Looks like you have Toulouse and perhaps mixes of Toulouse/Embden (the grey and white geese). Nope, there's no eye color sexing, nor feather sexing on these breeds. Unless you have a lot of familiarity with what is male/female behavior, and the sounds of their voices, sexing them will require vent sexing.

    My daughter's girlfriend has a flock of Pomeranians and brown Chinese. They are timid so I sat with them in their field and fed them by hand and about broke my brain determining sex. I was pretty sure about two or three ganders of the Poms. The Chinese were easier because of the knobs and the "whistle" of the ganders. Some young ganders are pretty timid too. I like to think I have male/female behavior "down" but I didn't get a good feel for most of them.

    Come March of next year, you will have definitive proof if you want to wait that long lol [​IMG]
     
  5. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    I would think the grey and white ones are saddleback pomeranians, where did you get them from? The only geese (that I know of) that can be sexed by their appearance are the chinese and africans because the males knob on top of the beak is bigger than the females knob. Other than that, you pretty much have to wait.

    There are some breeds of geese (white chinese and embden that I know of) that have blue eyes, so that is not a sex determinant. Also, both geese and ganders hiss, but the males are usually more friendly/outgoing than females, so you might be able to tell by that. Usually (not always) the females are shy and don't come up to you as readily. Also, the voices of the ganders is usually more high-pitched, where the goose's voice is a deeper 'honk'. Posture is another way you can tell, for example, gooses #2 & #5 are in a position that my ganders often do when they are telling me to 'git!'.

    Geese are seasonal layers, only in the spring. Though there are some (mostly the chinese) that can lay again in the fall.
     
  6. zazouse

    zazouse Overrun With Chickens

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    Those are beautiful geese.

    I have 3-8 month old tuffed Romans and they look and act exactly the same, well one does hang out with the roo's in rooster jail, and they are not friendly like my Chinese geese.

    I wished i new for sure what sex they were so i could get them some mates , cause i really like having geese around more than ducks



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  7. MamacatPatch

    MamacatPatch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Rooster Jail??? Too funny. Wow look at all those beautiful birds you have!!!

    We have our 'extra' roosters in an enclosed area and call it our Rooster "Bach [as in Bachelor] Pad"!! Two years in a row we picked out 10-15 chicks at our local farm store in a big water trough that said PULLETS on it and ended up with 4-8 ROOSTERS! ARGH! We left two of the least mean roos with the 20+ hens and it works out well.

    We bought our four Pekin ducks from the same store and got THREE boys and 1 girl!! One of our Blue Swede ducks lost his mate so we put him with the other ducks and he immediately got the girl Pekin duck and now they're mates. Unfortunately, the three male Pekin ducks still chase her incessantly and all try to 'hop on' her at once! Poor girl's neck is all scabby and raw but I don't know what else to do about it or if I should even try.
     
  8. MamacatPatch

    MamacatPatch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:They are in a very large enclosure with roosters, ducks and goats so even if I find goose eggs I would have no idea who laid em! Sure wish they had more differences like chickens do. Even male ducks have that feather butt curl and squawk instead of quack! LOL
     
  9. Kim65

    Kim65 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh, you'll know which geese are laying them. Let a few eggs build up in the nest and go stand next to it [​IMG] . While you are running away with bruises all over the backs of your legs [​IMG] you will have a pretty good idea who the girls are [​IMG]

    Once a goose lays a certain number of eggs, maybe ten or twelve, she may decide to go broody and sit on them. That's another way to tell 100% for sure.

    If you take away the eggs, she may lay up to twenty or even thirty eggs. Getting the eggs may be an interesting adventure in pain and wearing long leather gloves, depending on the goose. Mine focused on the backs of my knees, exquisitely painful and effective, but she is very mild and timid normally.

    I'm guessing they are young geese, less than a year old? Once they get used to you and their new environment, spend time observing them. The ganders always have their heads up, scanning for evil interlopers. I have two geese and a gander, and wherever he goes, they follow. The girls sort of hang back, and keep their heads and necks lower, while he will come forward, head held high, even when he runs like a weenie (he's a big puss).

    Ganders have higher pitched voices, too. They are the ones that screech. Geese have a lower pitched gobbly "honk", almost like a female duck quacking. It is several notes lower than the gander's voice. My embden girl practically has a basso profundo voice.

    Geese order themselves in traditional male/female roles, to the point of sexism. Ganders will boss the geese around, and lower ranked females will get bossed around by higher ranked females.

    So with some observation, you can get a decent guess going, and at least name them gender appropriate names going. Unless you have a flock of one sex, you should be able to get an idea before breeding season [​IMG]
     
  10. MamacatPatch

    MamacatPatch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:HAHA what a great post! I can already relate to what you've said! Chickens are the same way ... I'm convinced roosters are demon possessed! We have six geese and we raised them from little tykes and they run to us when we go out [food - the great motivator!] and we can get close to them but not close enough to touch them. I do like to sit out there and watch them. It's funny because our four pekin ducks were raised together with the geese so they pick on each other a lot, like siblings! Then throw the 3 Boer goats and a few demon possessed roosters in the mix and it's hilarious entertainment!
     

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