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Sexing New Hampshire Reds

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by rtho88, Dec 11, 2013.

  1. rtho88

    rtho88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 11, 2013
    Hey guys. My reds are around 6 weeks old and are starting to be so beautiful. I will post some pictures up, but I have 4 that have nice red combs and three that barely have any at all. I would say that 4 roo's and 3 hen's right off the bat, but I have seen some pictures of some very mature hens with very nice red combs and wattles.

    How else can I tell?? I will post some pics of them.
     
  2. spikennipper

    spikennipper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 25, 2009
    Kent, UK.
    Hi, bright red combs at 6 weeks are almost certain to be roos so you are right in your assumption that you have 4 roos and 3 hens, hens do have bright red combs but only when they are mature and coming into lay.
     
  3. rtho88

    rtho88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 11, 2013
    That's kind of what I'm thinking.

    [​IMG]

    Thinking a roo


    [​IMG]

    And another roo


    [​IMG]

    This would be one of my girls
     
  4. rtho88

    rtho88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 11, 2013
    These pics are a week old. Ill get some more. But that's the general difference in my 7 birds.

    Guess I'll be ordering a few more girls then!!
     
  5. rtho88

    rtho88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 11, 2013
    Roo?
    [​IMG]

    Roo?
    [​IMG]

    Last two I say hen

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Jun 18, 2010
    Southern Oregon
    I think you're correct. Mature, laying hens have nice red, plump combs, but immature pullets do not. Your red combed birds are indeed male.
     

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