Sexual Maturity of BO Roo?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Mom2Cool, Dec 5, 2008.

  1. Mom2Cool

    Mom2Cool Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi all I was wondering if you could all give me a basic idea as to how old my Mr. Standoffish will be when he starts looking for some ummm action from the girls? He's about 15 wkks now & he'd just started his crowing a few days ago. [​IMG] I was sure if they will run together as far as him looking for some ummm fun with the girls? Any advice on what to expect I'd appreciate... LOL I do have my pullet hen Miss Chicky in the coop with him & she only just started laying a couple weeks ago (she's 6 months old) & so I don't need to worry yet about fertile eggs right?
     
  2. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    I'm not sure what you mean by worrying about fertile eggs?
    If she's laying and she's been with the roo for any length of time you can expect the eggs to be fertile. A hen stores the roo's sperm and can fertilize eggs with it long after the deed is done.
    There is no difference nutritionally or taste-wise in fertile vs. non-fertile eggs and you really have to look to see the difference.
    And oh yeah, if he's crowing I would consider him at least somewhat fertile.
     
  3. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    I think about 18-20 weeks.... I want to ask why you would "worry" about fertilized eggs?
     
  4. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    He should already be trying to woo them with his manly ways.

    He should also be trying to mount them - if they will let him.

    He has to earn it. The hens/pullets won't just let him have his way from the start.
     
  5. Mom2Cool

    Mom2Cool Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ok well first let me say I think the word "worry" is just a vocabulary word that is used by me because well I'm a mom & you know we all worry. LOL I had just used the wrong word there. It isn't "worry" or even "concern" but rather it was more curiosity as to "hmmmm could Miss Chicky & Mr. Standoffish be fooling around??? LOL

    I'm just still new to all these first time experiences & so when my "instinct tells me something" I don't always feel I can just rely on that because it's still a first for all of this you know? Quiet frankly I'd thought the other day him starting to crow was a sign he was REAL happy.... With the cold weather now I don't let them out of the coop until a bit later & some times the noise coming from the coop heavens LOL us moms don't need more to worry about. LOL Seriously I've a cam monitor so to cut back on anything that would really cause worry. And this was just curiosity really.
     
  6. Mom2Cool

    Mom2Cool Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:MissPrissy you had me in stiches with this really..... & so I'm just going to continue to ask the curiosity questions and so the one that popped to mind when I read your post is will he be trying to mount the pullet girls that haven't started laying eggs yet? MissChicky is older than all of the Buff Orpingtons & so I could see him being interested in her but am I do think now he's looking at the *young ones* too? I don't mind saying I don't know what he has to do to "woo them" but I had told hubby a couple weeks ago that I'd considered changing his name to "Heartthrob" because the pullets all seem to just like flock around him like he's a a Heartthrob off of teenbeat magazine... I think this is why I had to really laugh at your posting because I seem to recall a Loonie Toones cartoon from years ago where they had a Roo that was singing like Frank Sinatra & all the chickens where all swooning & passing out around him. I wasn't sure but I think MissPrissy cartoon character could have been in that cartoon. It was part of the old Sat. Morning cartoons & I'm probably really dating myself here huh?
     
  7. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Roosters will dance for their women.

    He will drop one wing to the ground and the foot dance is akin to a native american campfire style dance. He will circle her and call to her. Then he will try to mount her. Most pullets and hens will either turn and give him the death stare or they will just walk away. Eventually he will tired of them shunning his advances and he will get a little agrressive. He will grab them and hold them to the ground to show them he is dominant over them. He will also mount them. Once he steps up to the plate and proves he is "The Rooster in the Hen House", King of the Coop, they will let him mate them. they will also snuggle up to him and sleep in a tight circle around him.

    Honestly, in the world of animals, watching my rooster tame his hens and claim his harem is one of the most intriguing and fascinating events I have ever witnessed.

    There is a gentle beauty in the protcetive nature he will exhibit. he will coo and call his girls and left them eat first or show them where food is. He will cheer on a first time layer and even if needed help her made a nest to lay in.

    Roosters, even the mean ones, are a delight to witness.

    We could all take a lesson from the world of chickens.

    There is romance in the coop.
     
  8. Mom2Cool

    Mom2Cool Chillin' With My Peeps

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    MissPrissy I have to tell you that one of the reasons I think of this boy as a "heartthrob" is that he's always had this way with the girls. I've never seen him be aggressive with them though even from the beginning when I first put them in together I had them all sectioned off so MissChicky wouldn't kill the Buff Orpingtons & then later I'd let them free range while I was of course there with them... this roo was just *relentless* in her accepting him & would like "hang around" & mozie (for lack of a better word) his way to being almost next to her. She'd shoo him away in very clear terms to get the hell away etc. now he was *real young* & just like 9 wks old at the time but it was he who wore her down at the start I thought so that she wasn't just hawling off letting them all have it. she's still a bit of an outsider still when it comes to the BO's grouping together but she'll sleep amongst them all now even outside the coop etc. But I did see this boy just continue to come back for more & more & just duck her attacks toward him. & the little BO pullets they've always sort of been in a tight circle around him.

    this is the normal group of them & he is most often the "center of it"

    [​IMG]

    Then they'll all decide to like hunger down & yes they're all up close & tight & that often includes on the perches in the coop at night too.

    It is quiet funny to watch him or to see him sort of strut around because it's like he's so full of himself that they're all chasing each other to get to him? That's why I say he reminds me of some heartthrob straight from the cover os "TeenBeat" magazine... LOL

    Oh & as I'd read your post to hubby & I got to the part of the pullets & hens giving the death stare hubby said "Oh so it's just like humans?" ROFL & yes *they could use the reminder of the romance from the coop there*... [​IMG]
     
  9. redoak

    redoak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My buff orpington rooster starting doing his roostering at 16 weeks old. The hens hated him and would avoid/hide/roost just to get away from him. So I put him in the bachelor pad with my other rooster and didn't let him in with the hens until the hens were starting to squat.
     
  10. Superior Chicks

    Superior Chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    What a wonderful post MissPrissy------well said indeed!

    I couldn't agree with you more regarding Roosters and their wonderful antics, and indeed, importance to the flock.

    I dearly miss my guy. Although it was sometimes a love/hate relationship, as I had to put saddles on ALL the hens due to his "loving" ways![​IMG] But the flock was amazing to watch. How he called to them, gave them treats, sounded the warnings, gathered them in at dusk. I agree with your fascinating and intriguing description. I watched them for hours on end.

    I now can not have a rooster, and he will be dearly missed. The social aspect of keeping chickens is a truly wonderful experience!

    Thank you for your thoughtful support of a fine creature!

    Ma
     

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