Shadrach's Ex Battery and Rescued chickens thread.

Folly's place

Enabler
10 Years
Sep 13, 2011
24,323
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southern Michigan
Here in Michigan there are some avian specialists, and some veterinarians who have poultry of their own, so develop an interest in poultry medicine.
Very few chicken owners are willing to spend money for veterinary care for their birds, and the veterinarians who service commercial poultry operations have no time or the ability to treat backyard birds.
And then there's the cost angle; should the veterinarian who spends the time and money, learning about chickens then treat them for nothing, because they are 'only chickens'? Sometime yes, often no. It's still humans who treat the bird, not the other way around.
Rant over...
Mary
 

MTKitty

Songster
Aug 14, 2021
470
2,372
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MT
Lurker’s tax ...

F7301DFF-DE12-4C2C-8EB6-7EC8A4DE5EDC.jpeg

A rather shabby-looking, mid-molt, teen-aged Buckeye and my personal fave, Drupe.
 

Shadrach

Roosterist
Premium Feather Member
Jul 31, 2018
19,855
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Catalonia, Spain & UK
My Coop
My Coop
Here in Michigan there are some avian specialists, and some veterinarians who have poultry of their own, so develop an interest in poultry medicine.
Very few chicken owners are willing to spend money for veterinary care for their birds, and the veterinarians who service commercial poultry operations have no time or the ability to treat backyard birds.
And then there's the cost angle; should the veterinarian who spends the time and money, learning about chickens then treat them for nothing, because they are 'only chickens'? Sometime yes, often no. It's still humans who treat the bird, not the other way around.
Rant over...
Mary
There are some excellent avian vets in the UK but they are expensive.
Part of the problem is people tend to have more chickens than they do say dogs.
$300.00 for a dog vet bill many owners will pay. $300.00 for a chicken vet bill is seen as expensive.
There are charities like PDSA who will treat houshold creatures for a donation only but most do not have avian vets.
 

Ribh

Weirder, stranger, quirkier, lovelier
Dec 18, 2018
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Island, Australia
My Coop
My Coop
There are some excellent avian vets in the UK but they are expensive.
Part of the problem is people tend to have more chickens than they do say dogs.
$300.00 for a dog vet bill many owners will pay. $300.00 for a chicken vet bill is seen as expensive.
There are charities like PDSA who will treat houshold creatures for a donation only but most do not have avian vets.
Plus you can treat a chicken & they will still die. Had that happen too many times. :( It can quickly become very expensive.
 

Lady Red

Free Ranging
Apr 4, 2021
1,447
16,656
586
Here in Michigan there are some avian specialists, and some veterinarians who have poultry of their own, so develop an interest in poultry medicine.
Very few chicken owners are willing to spend money for veterinary care for their birds, and the veterinarians who service commercial poultry operations have no time or the ability to treat backyard birds.
And then there's the cost angle; should the veterinarian who spends the time and money, learning about chickens then treat them for nothing, because they are 'only chickens'? Sometime yes, often no. It's still humans who treat the bird, not the other way around.
Rant over...
Mary
I have approximately 12 vet offices within a 20 minute drive here. Only one will see chickens. We had a hormone injection done on our young, over producing golden comet.
 
Jul 22, 2020
181
1,114
136
Minnesota, USA
Hello all. I've been meaning to go through and read this thread and found some time to sit down with it today. I will post some tax here but I am sure I will quickly be in debt.

Here is my boy, named Furio by a relative of mine. This picture is from this summer.

IMG_20210613_195627955.jpg


He is about 1 1/2 years old. I currently have him and two of his teenage sons, Magpie and Jackdaw. I will also be posting pictures of boys that have since passed on. Most of my birds are mix breed mutts. There are also 3 (used to be 5) ex batts that are going on 3 1/2 years now. I lost one fairly soon after I got them (at 16 months old) and had another disappear this summer. This spring I was given charge of 25 high production hatchery chicks who are now about 8 1/2 months old. Those that have survived the laying issues and the general lack of brains have stopped laying for the winter at least. There are also 4 older hatchery birds. I don't know how old they are as I got them as adults and the flock owner didn't keep track of individual birds but they are all at least 4 years old.

Some tax:

Jackdaw on the left and Magpie on the right happily stuffing themselves on the goat grain before the goats get let out.
IMG_20211126_093417310.jpg


Furio, currently mid molt and looking a bit shabby.
IMG_20211130_130637734.jpg
 

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