Shadrach's Ex Battery and Rescued chickens thread.

BigBlueHen53

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Mar 5, 2019
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SE Missouri, USA
My BJG (which I have since lost to a coyote 😢), had an enormous comb and majestic wattles. He lost much of both to frostbite his first winter, which was brutal (2020/21, which was when a lot of TX also got shut down due to ice and cold). He was definitely in pain. He could not eat from the feeder, which has 3" PVC openings, without scraping both comb and wattles on the PVC. We fed him separately from a flat dish. Not much we could do about the water. His wattles dangled in the water and got wet, the temps were brutal and never let up. He became very much a pet, knowing that his food came from us and not a feeder. I do miss him. No bird should be considered "cold hardy" if it has large comb and wattles, IMO. I love BJGs but will never have another in this climate. Our winters are not long but they can be severe.
 

Shadrach

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Jul 31, 2018
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This gives a better idea of Henry's size.
PA080372.JPG
 

Marie2020

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May 12, 2020
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My BJG (which I have since lost to a coyote 😢), had an enormous comb and majestic wattles. He lost much of both to frostbite his first winter, which was brutal (2020/21, which was when a lot of TX also got shut down due to ice and cold). He was definitely in pain. He could not eat from the feeder, which has 3" PVC openings, without scraping both comb and wattles on the PVC. We fed him separately from a flat dish. Not much we could do about the water. His wattles dangled in the water and got wet, the temps were brutal and never let up. He became very much a pet, knowing that his food came from us and not a feeder. I do miss him. No bird should be considered "cold hardy" if it has large comb and wattles, IMO. I love BJGs but will never have another in this climate. Our winters are not long but they can be severe.
Poor little love
 

Marie2020

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May 12, 2020
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Poor little love
I've covered a large part of the coop and run leaving air holes.

We get bad winters and sometimes can't get out of our doors. I thinking because I don't have an automatic door I should hang a curtain because, if we get stuck so at least they can get to eat from their run.
 
Last edited:

Iluveggers

Free Ranging
Jun 27, 2021
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NYS
My BJG (which I have since lost to a coyote 😢), had an enormous comb and majestic wattles. He lost much of both to frostbite his first winter, which was brutal (2020/21, which was when a lot of TX also got shut down due to ice and cold). He was definitely in pain. He could not eat from the feeder, which has 3" PVC openings, without scraping both comb and wattles on the PVC. We fed him separately from a flat dish. Not much we could do about the water. His wattles dangled in the water and got wet, the temps were brutal and never let up. He became very much a pet, knowing that his food came from us and not a feeder. I do miss him. No bird should be considered "cold hardy" if it has large comb and wattles, IMO. I love BJGs but will never have another in this climate. Our winters are not long but they can be severe.
I tend to feel if chickens are used to an environment it will affect them less. In NY we have long, cold winters, but it isn’t a shock to them because they are exposed gradually. I feel like it would be harder on a bird where it was hot for a long time & there was a drastic, unexpected drop in temp. Especially since owners would be less likely to be ready. We have tarps, headed waterers, and wind blocks set up. Even an emergency heater in case it gets to negative temps for an extended time. Does that make sense or am I completely off base?
 

Shadrach

Roosterist
Premium Feather Member
Jul 31, 2018
19,904
169,056
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Catalonia, Spain & UK
My Coop
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I tend to feel if chickens are used to an environment it will affect them less. In NY we have long, cold winters, but it isn’t a shock to them because they are exposed gradually. I feel like it would be harder on a bird where it was hot for a long time & there was a drastic, unexpected drop in temp. Especially since owners would be less likely to be ready. We have tarps, headed waterers, and wind blocks set up. Even an emergency heater in case it gets to negative temps for an extended time. Does that make sense or am I completely off base?
You're making perfect sense.:)
 

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