Shelby

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by raquelita73s, Jun 14, 2016.

  1. raquelita73s

    raquelita73s New Egg

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    Hi. We have had a rooster, Shelby, since he was a chick. He is about 1 now. He's very feisty and always wants to attack us. Does anyone have any ideas on how to tame him. I really don't want to get rid of him because we all love him but I don't want him to hurt the kids or myself either. Please help. Thank you
     
  2. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    I'd give him 2 weeks max to reform. But, this... only of you can do so safely without the children being involved. Carry a long stick with you, about 4' long. It doesn't have to be very thick. I use a fiberglass fence post. Every time you go out to tend birds, spend some time chasing him around. If he doesn't get out of your way, place the stick against his tail feathers to get him moving along. You don't have to run (unless you really want some exercise) though, at first, you want to move fast enough that he doesn't get a chance to stop and think about what's happening. You want him running from you. And every time you get close enough, give him a little tap with the stick. Not to hurt him, but to keep him moving. For a while, do this every time you see him. When you go to tend the flock, make him move out of your way. Never go around him. If he happens to be standing somewhere, you decide that that's where YOU want to be, and you make him give up that particular piece of real-estate. If you give treats, use your stick to keep him away from the treats until YOU say he can have some. Same with feeding. Keep him away from the food till YOU decide he can have some. If he's in the coop, chase him out. In essence, you are taking over the Alpha role, and forcing him to submit. An other technique is to grab him and place him in a foot ball hold. You secure his feet so he can't scratch, and pin his wings between your chest and your arm. You then use your other hand to force his head down below his chest. Keep doing so, until he willingly keeps his head down. Then, you lower him to the ground, while you still have him restrained. Set his feet on the ground. He'll immediately struggle to get away. Force his head down into the submissive pose again, and (hold/repeat as needed) keep it there till he submits and stops struggling. You can then let him go. Don't do this unless you are confident that you can do so without him getting away or you getting hurt. He'll pick up on any fear, and you will then have lost that round. Never back up from a rooster. Always be dressed and prepared to do battle with him, take the aggressive role. If he's being aggressive to you, you may need to whale the tar out of him. If he does not reform completely, he'll make a wonderful soup.
     
  3. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    My Rooster last year was a mean bugger.
    Attacked me daily. He is no longer here.
    I am Trying another cockerel this year but right from the start I have been having him move out of my space.
    Never turn your back and have him mind your space.
    Or like the other poster suggested have a nice bowl of soup?
     
  4. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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  5. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    If you free range? I just noticed you mentioned kids...Keep him locked in. Roosters pick on kids and smaller woman. Really keep an eye on him.
    A Rooster attack can be awful, bloody and very scary. They usually wont back down once it's in fight mode! I had to kick mine out the pop door or he would of kept on attacking me!
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2016

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