Shellless Egg?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by JackE, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. JackE

    JackE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yesterday, While gathering the eggs. I found one without a shell. It was like a skin egg. It looked like a pale tan egg, Without a shell. The chickens free range, and I have food and fresh water available in the house. I also have oyster shell available to them. Chickens have been laying for about 3mos. Anybody seen this before?
    Thanks, Jack
     
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Oh yes! It happens not infrequently, especially in new layers, ailing/injured birds and during/after molting. Your girls are still relatively new at this whole laying business, so it is to be expected that they still have a few kinks to work out in the plumbing. Nothing to worry about.

    Good luck.
     
  3. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Chances are most all of us whose chickens are laying have seen it one time or another. I probably get 2-3 of them a year.
     
  4. JackE

    JackE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the quick replys. I was hoping that it wasn't a big deal. I have gathered some odd shaped eggs, but never a shellless one. Thanks again, Jack
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    What often happens is that the hen lays two eggs in one day and the shell gland does not have enough shell material built up for the second egg. In that case, it has nothing to do with how much calcium they are eating. The gland just does not have enough time to process the calcium.

    If it becomes consistent with one hen and not the flock in general, it is likely a genetic thing. Again, unless it is flock wide, it has nothing to do with how much calcium they are eating but her genetic ability to process the calcium. Since this sounds like a rare occurrence for you, my guess is on the first reason.
     

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