Shipped eggs in hot weather?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by jackson41, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. jackson41

    jackson41 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is it not a good time of year to ship eggs because of the heat?
     
  2. Stellar

    Stellar The Quail Lady

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    It's fine to ship eggs. I learned recently, here from Texas Chris, that you just set the eggs right away in the incubator during the hot months instead of letting them rest.
     
  3. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Well, there is always the possibility they will totally cook if they really overheat. At lesser levels of heat, you may see a diminished hatch rate. But, there are a lot of other variables. Last summer, which was pretty hot in the south and definitely warmer than normal here, I got various batches of quail eggs. I got them from Florida, Texas, Louisiana, and Oregon. The Oregon batch did have the best hatch rate overall, but they also came later, almost Labor Day, when it had cooled off here quite a bit. Hatch rate varied between 25-30% to about 60%, average was probably about 50% give or take.

    I look at it this way. Overall, quail eggs are pretty cheap. I would definitely not let the weather stop me, I would just plan on twice as many, roughly, as you hope to hatch, to compensate for all of the issues that shipped eggs involve, not just the weather.
     
  4. Fat Daddy

    Fat Daddy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:You gett'in ready to set some chukars kate? I lock mine down thurs. and should hatch sat. Bill
     
  5. MobyQuail

    MobyQuail c. giganticus

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    so, during hot weather, there is consensus to set the eggs in the bator when you get them, do not turn for ~1-3 days. I am testing that theory here too.

    can we theorize, any fertile, but non-viable- "cooked eggs" from hot weather shipping, will be at the 1-4 day stage of development?

    how do we sort out the difference between shipping abuse through handling and/or hot weather shipping, to get the true % difference.

    at what max./min. temp during days 1-4 and for how long are hatching eggs hatchability % terminated.

    what max./min. temp and for how long does the inside of the vehicles transporting the precious cargo get to? how do we find out? hmm. send a digital thermometer with max./min. readings in the mail with a load of eggs?
     
  6. Fat Daddy

    Fat Daddy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Wow TD, If you would have came up with this little gem of wit yesterday, I would have added one to the box.... great idea. Bill
     
  7. joe125

    joe125 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 20, 2010
    An ounce of patience=a ton of over thinking things. Just my opinion. [​IMG]

    Hatching shipped eggs is an art, not a science. I know that Charles, can calculate multiple variables, calculate differential conditions based on time zone/temp, GPS readings and expensive electronic devices placed in packages in typical "NUM3ERS" fashion.

    Just let them sit still 10-24 hours before setting, allow -1 day to +2 days for hatching based on species, and stop trying to over think things!

    That simple formula has served me well for over 4 years now, but your results may vary.
     
  8. Chikndinner

    Chikndinner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Why do you have to let them sit still for 12-24 hours before setting?
     
  9. Stellar

    Stellar The Quail Lady

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    Quote:shipping makes the box move around, everyone packs eggs differently and the eggs can move around, membranes can rupture: letting them settle simply let's them get all their gear together. During hot months this can be done in the incubator with the turner off a day or two. I tried it after Shelley, Riffecreef and Texas Chris mentioned it. It sure helps hatchability alright!
     
  10. FeatheredObsessions

    FeatheredObsessions Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 24, 2010
    Oregon
    The Chalaza (hols yolk in place) can get stretched in shipping. Settling helps it regain it's spring like structure before it goes into full on growth and development mode too.
     

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