Should I break her or Leave her?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by chickencrazy999, Feb 13, 2014.

  1. chickencrazy999

    chickencrazy999 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello, I have a broody white silkie bantam and she has been sitting one week tomorrow but I can not hatch until march and I do not know what to do I have been told that not to break her otherwise she may not go broody agape she may not be faithful or a good mother and I am quite confused I will be able to get some fertile eggs at the beginning of march so should I break her or just leave her until March she seems well enough and I make sure she eats and drinks everyday and that I bring her up some treats to nibble on but I do not know she is really determined and has pulled out her breast feathers.she really wants some babies! My other question is I have a very young rooster and he is only 9 weeks old when will he be able to breed ? And fertilise the eggs he is a white leghorn cockerel Thanks here's a pic of Muffin my broody silkie and Cheese my white leghorn cockerel [​IMG]
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  2. Silkie's go broody all the time it is in their nature. They make the best momma's.

    I have broken a lot of Silkie's from brooding and they go right back to it after they start laying again.
     
  3. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I'd break her. If you try to keep her broody until March, it's quite a stress on her body and you run the risk of her giving up before the eggs hatch. From what I understand, silkies go broody at the drop of a hat, so it shouldn't be a problem to get her going again.
     
  4. chickencrazy999

    chickencrazy999 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 6, 2013
    England, UK
    Ok thanks so how should I break her ?
     
  5. What I do is I have a separate wire cage that I put them in with food and water, no nest in there and in about a week they are usually no longer broody.
     

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